Tuesday Map: Bombs over Tskhinvali

Once again, UNOSAT’s where it’s at –- and this time their satellite imagery takes us to a very damaged South Ossetia: UNOSAT This map illustrates the structural damage wrought to villages between Kekhvi and Tskhinvali as of August 19, 2008, just three days after Russia signed a ceasefire bringing the Russian-Georgia war over the region ...

592727_080909_map5.jpg
592727_080909_map5.jpg

Once again, UNOSAT's where it's at –- and this time their satellite imagery takes us to a very damaged South Ossetia:

UNOSAT

This map illustrates the structural damage wrought to villages between Kekhvi and Tskhinvali as of August 19, 2008, just three days after Russia signed a ceasefire bringing the Russian-Georgia war over the region to a close. Buildings either completely collapsed or with less than 50 percent of its roof still intact appear in red; those with visible structural damage to a wall or roof are marked in orange.

Once again, UNOSAT’s where it’s at –- and this time their satellite imagery takes us to a very damaged South Ossetia:

UNOSAT

This map illustrates the structural damage wrought to villages between Kekhvi and Tskhinvali as of August 19, 2008, just three days after Russia signed a ceasefire bringing the Russian-Georgia war over the region to a close. Buildings either completely collapsed or with less than 50 percent of its roof still intact appear in red; those with visible structural damage to a wall or roof are marked in orange.

Interestingly (read: disturbingly), the map notes:

An important preliminary finding of this satellite damage analysis is the observed heavy concentration of damages within clearly defined residential areas.”

Maybe that explains those remains of 500 civilians — and they’re still counting.

Lucy Moore is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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