Is the SEC scrutinizing you?

My favorite part of The Economist magazine might just be the advertisements. Where else can you find jobs with titles like “Project Manager: Violent Extremism“? But you can also learn a lot about the current state of the world by looking at the ads. For the last year, oil companies from Chevron to BP have ...

592577_080916_bingham5.jpg
592577_080916_bingham5.jpg

My favorite part of The Economist magazine might just be the advertisements. Where else can you find jobs with titles like "Project Manager: Violent Extremism"? But you can also learn a lot about the current state of the world by looking at the ads. For the last year, oil companies from Chevron to BP have filled pages rattling off their green credentials. But last night, I found a whole new breed of Economist ad in the Sept. 6 issue:

Has it really come to this? Are there so many firms out there seeking shelter from the watchful eye of the SEC that it makes economic sense for a law firm to run a two-page spread in The Economist? According to the rate card, a 4-color, full-bleed, two-page spread can run more than $300,000 for worldwide circulation, and nearly $200,000 for North America only.

A bad economy usually doesn't bode well for magazine advertising sales, but apparently white-collar crime is a goldmine.

My favorite part of The Economist magazine might just be the advertisements. Where else can you find jobs with titles like “Project Manager: Violent Extremism“? But you can also learn a lot about the current state of the world by looking at the ads. For the last year, oil companies from Chevron to BP have filled pages rattling off their green credentials. But last night, I found a whole new breed of Economist ad in the Sept. 6 issue:

Has it really come to this? Are there so many firms out there seeking shelter from the watchful eye of the SEC that it makes economic sense for a law firm to run a two-page spread in The Economist? According to the rate card, a 4-color, full-bleed, two-page spread can run more than $300,000 for worldwide circulation, and nearly $200,000 for North America only.

A bad economy usually doesn’t bode well for magazine advertising sales, but apparently white-collar crime is a goldmine.

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