Russia to help with space program… in Cuba?

VLADIMIR RODIONOV/AFP/Getty Images Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Sechin’s Latin American trip took an odd turn in Cuba earlier this week. After searching for ways that Moscow could help clean up the mess that Hurricanes Gustav and Ike left behind, the two countries had a more lofty goal to discuss: building a Cuban space center. ...

By , International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.
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592502_080918_gagarin5.jpg

VLADIMIR RODIONOV/AFP/Getty Images

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Sechin's Latin American trip took an odd turn in Cuba earlier this week. After searching for ways that Moscow could help clean up the mess that Hurricanes Gustav and Ike left behind, the two countries had a more lofty goal to discuss: building a Cuban space center.

Yes, really. Though the details are unclear, Russia and its famed Cold War ally discussed the possibility of sharing technology to build Cuba's space program. Russia's Federal Space Agency issued a press release officially announcing the intent to collaborate this morning (sorry, it's in Russian).

VLADIMIR RODIONOV/AFP/Getty Images

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Sechin’s Latin American trip took an odd turn in Cuba earlier this week. After searching for ways that Moscow could help clean up the mess that Hurricanes Gustav and Ike left behind, the two countries had a more lofty goal to discuss: building a Cuban space center.

Yes, really. Though the details are unclear, Russia and its famed Cold War ally discussed the possibility of sharing technology to build Cuba’s space program. Russia’s Federal Space Agency issued a press release officially announcing the intent to collaborate this morning (sorry, it’s in Russian).

Imagery of Cuba and Russia collaborating on anything that flies, of course, conjures up alarmingly unpleasant memories. Too bad the bargaining doesn’t end there. After Havana, Sechin took off for Venezuela, where Russia is looking to close a deal to sell fighter jets and air defense systems to President Hugo Chávez after joint military exercises last week.

Just like the Cold War days, get used to Russia reaching for the stars.

Elizabeth Dickinson is International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.

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