Ugandan drivers: beware the miniskirt menace

In his remarks to reporters today, Uganda’s ethics and integrity minister sounded like he was auditioning for a guest spot on Project Runway‘s judging panel. The minister, Nsaba Buturo, told reporters in Kampala that he was seeking a ban against the miniskirt. He equated the skimpy attire to, well, nakedness and went on to say ...

In his remarks to reporters today, Uganda's ethics and integrity minister sounded like he was auditioning for a guest spot on Project Runway's judging panel. The minister, Nsaba Buturo, told reporters in Kampala that he was seeking a ban against the miniskirt. He equated the skimpy attire to, well, nakedness and went on to say that not only is the miniskirt indecent, but the women sporting the fashion staple pose a serious danger to drivers:

What's wrong with a miniskirt? You can cause an accident because some of our people are weak mentally." He continued arguing that, "if you find a naked person you begin to concentrate on the make-up of that person and yet you are driving."

The BBC notes that Buturo is seeking to rid Uganda of its many vices, and inappropriate dress is just one of the many indecent items that appear on the minister's list. Among others are theft and embezzlement of public funds, sub-standard service delivery, greed, infidelity, prostitution, and homosexuality. But I guess miniskirts were the low-hanging fruit.

In his remarks to reporters today, Uganda’s ethics and integrity minister sounded like he was auditioning for a guest spot on Project Runway‘s judging panel. The minister, Nsaba Buturo, told reporters in Kampala that he was seeking a ban against the miniskirt. He equated the skimpy attire to, well, nakedness and went on to say that not only is the miniskirt indecent, but the women sporting the fashion staple pose a serious danger to drivers:

What’s wrong with a miniskirt? You can cause an accident because some of our people are weak mentally." He continued arguing that, "if you find a naked person you begin to concentrate on the make-up of that person and yet you are driving."

The BBC notes that Buturo is seeking to rid Uganda of its many vices, and inappropriate dress is just one of the many indecent items that appear on the minister’s list. Among others are theft and embezzlement of public funds, sub-standard service delivery, greed, infidelity, prostitution, and homosexuality. But I guess miniskirts were the low-hanging fruit.

Tag: Africa

More from Foreign Policy

A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed  according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.
A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.

Why Do People Hate Realism So Much?

The school of thought doesn’t explain everything—but its proponents foresaw the potential for conflict over Ukraine long before it erupted.

Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.
Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.

China’s Crisis of Confidence

What if, instead of being a competitor, China can no longer afford to compete at all?

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.

Why This Global Economic Crisis Is Different

This is the first time since World War II that there may be no cooperative way out.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.

China Is Hardening Itself for Economic War

Beijing is trying to close economic vulnerabilities out of fear of U.S. containment.