Obama gives me a reason to vote for McCain

Here’s the latest Obama ad for Michigan:    I have no doubt this will play in Michigan — but the ad has a different effect on your humble blogger:  The ad implies that Obama’s willing to give out loan guarantees to Detroit.  Question to Obama’s economic team — are there any industries you are not going to offer ...

Here's the latest Obama ad for Michigan:    I have no doubt this will play in Michigan -- but the ad has a different effect on your humble blogger:  The ad implies that Obama's willing to give out loan guarantees to Detroit.  Question to Obama's economic team -- are there any industries you are not going to offer a federal handout?  And no, oil doesn't count.  My Democrat friends keep insisting that Obama doesn't mean any of his protectionist rhetoric.  But how many ads about "shipping jobs overseas" does it take for one to wonder about Obama's foreign economic policy?  This ad actually brings up one of the few actual "straight talk" moments for McCain in this campaign -- when he told Michigan auto workers that he wasn't going to be able to bring their jobs back.  One of the side benefits of the widening number of swing states is that the rust belt starts to matter less.  Which means that maybe in another election cycle or two protectionist pandering like this becomes less necessary [You're dreaming, you know that, right?--ed.  Oh, let me have this fantasy.] I'm not necessarily going to vote for McCain -- but ads like this sure don't give me warm fuzzies about Obama. 

Here’s the latest Obama ad for Michigan: 

 

I have no doubt this will play in Michigan — but the ad has a different effect on your humble blogger: 

  1. The ad implies that Obama’s willing to give out loan guarantees to Detroit.  Question to Obama’s economic team — are there any industries you are not going to offer a federal handout?  And no, oil doesn’t count. 
  2. My Democrat friends keep insisting that Obama doesn’t mean any of his protectionist rhetoric.  But how many ads about “shipping jobs overseas” does it take for one to wonder about Obama’s foreign economic policy? 
  3. This ad actually brings up one of the few actual “straight talk” moments for McCain in this campaign — when he told Michigan auto workers that he wasn’t going to be able to bring their jobs back. 
  4. One of the side benefits of the widening number of swing states is that the rust belt starts to matter less.  Which means that maybe in another election cycle or two protectionist pandering like this becomes less necessary [You’re dreaming, you know that, right?–ed.  Oh, let me have this fantasy.]

I’m not necessarily going to vote for McCain — but ads like this sure don’t give me warm fuzzies about Obama. 

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at Tufts University’s Fletcher School. He blogged regularly for Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2014. Twitter: @dandrezner

More from Foreign Policy

A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed  according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.
A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.

Why Do People Hate Realism So Much?

The school of thought doesn’t explain everything—but its proponents foresaw the potential for conflict over Ukraine long before it erupted.

Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.
Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.

China’s Crisis of Confidence

What if, instead of being a competitor, China can no longer afford to compete at all?

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.

Why This Global Economic Crisis Is Different

This is the first time since World War II that there may be no cooperative way out.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.

China Is Hardening Itself for Economic War

Beijing is trying to close economic vulnerabilities out of fear of U.S. containment.