Does Uncle Sam now sponsor Manchester United?

Shaun Botterill/Getty Images Remember the logo adorning Manchester United’s red jerseys? That’s right: AIG. Sponsorship of the legendary British soccer team, these days worth about £67 million (down from £75 million last year, thanks again to the credit crunch), belongs to the beleaguered insurance company. That means it now, sort of, belongs to the United ...

By , International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.
592369_080925_ronaldo5.jpg
592369_080925_ronaldo5.jpg

Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

Remember the logo adorning Manchester United's red jerseys? That's right: AIG. Sponsorship of the legendary British soccer team, these days worth about £67 million (down from £75 million last year, thanks again to the credit crunch), belongs to the beleaguered insurance company. That means it now, sort of, belongs to the United States' taxpayers?

Ever since Tony Blair was portrayed as George W. Bush's second coming during his support for the Iraq war, many Britons resented American influence on their country's politics. But this kind-of sponsorship of the flagship football team might just cross the line.

Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

Remember the logo adorning Manchester United’s red jerseys? That’s right: AIG. Sponsorship of the legendary British soccer team, these days worth about £67 million (down from £75 million last year, thanks again to the credit crunch), belongs to the beleaguered insurance company. That means it now, sort of, belongs to the United States’ taxpayers?

Ever since Tony Blair was portrayed as George W. Bush’s second coming during his support for the Iraq war, many Britons resented American influence on their country’s politics. But this kind-of sponsorship of the flagship football team might just cross the line.

Apparently, Manchester supporters are pragmatists. Oh well! say most fans on RedCafe.net, a Manchester United forum where the topic was heatedly debated. Rather than sweat the details, they had far more fun imagining a new look for the team.

Elizabeth Dickinson is International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.

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