DON'T LOSE ACCESS:
Your IP access to ForeignPolicy.com will expire on June 15
.

To ensure uninterrupted reading, please contact Rachel Mines, sales director, at rachel.mines@foreignpolicy.com.

Passport

Israel’s new weapon

ABBAS MOMANI/AFP/Getty Images The creative minds inside Israel’s Border Police have invented a new crowd control weapon, one that pays homage to that devil of a stinker, Pepé Le Pew.  Israel’s police force has a bad rep when it comes to deploying force against protestors — both left-wing Israeli activists and Palestinians. Critics have called ...

592253_081006_skunk2.jpg

ABBAS MOMANI/AFP/Getty Images

The creative minds inside Israel’s Border Police have invented a new crowd control weapon, one that pays homage to that devil of a stinker, Pepé Le Pew. 

Israel’s police force has a bad rep when it comes to deploying force against protestors — both left-wing Israeli activists and Palestinians. Critics have called into question the use of rubber-covered steel bullets (which when shot at close range can shatter bones) and tear gas (which burns the eyes and induces vomiting) on numerous occasions.

The push to find alternative, less dangerous weaponry began in 2000 after 13 Arab Israelis were killed by police fire. In a conscious effort to reduce potential injury when force is required (and to avoid future flak), Israeli security forces are now employing a new invention: “The Skunk.” 

The concoction, sprayed in a cannon-like stream into the air, showering down upon crowds, is said to be highly effective.

Here’s how one BBC reporter describes it:

Imagine the worst, most foul thing you have ever smelled. An overpowering mix of rotting meat, old socks that haven’t been washed for weeks — topped off with the pungent waft of an open sewer.

Imagine being covered in the stuff as it is liberally sprayed from a water cannon.

Then imagine not being able to get rid of the stench for at least three days, no matter how often you try to scrub yourself clean.” 

The stench — which apparently lingers on the skin and in hair for days and can be smelled from quite a distance — is a serious problem. Apparently, neither soap nor tomato sauce is doing the job. It’s so potent that even police stations can’t store Skunk, as the smell permeates containers.

While some are still unsure that Israel’s police force has found its silver bullet, amazingly, the substance is completely non-toxic and contains zero poison. The head of the police’s department of technological development, David Ben Harosh, who, much to the dismay of his family first tested Skunk on himself, says it’s so safe, You can drink it, and you would definitely have a great protein drink.” 

Many in Israel and Palestine are likely to celebrate the steps the Israeli police are taking to reduce violence, but I doubt anyone caught in the spray will be toasting The Skunk.

Trending Now Sponsored Links by Taboola

By Taboola

More from Foreign Policy

By Taboola