Morning Brief: The Obama show

Top Story As if to flaunt his dominance in fundraising and in the media, Democratic nominee Barack Obama aired an unusual 30-minute advertisement on three different networks last night. He also appeared Wednesday on ABC’s World News with Charlie Gibson, The Daily Show with John Stewart, and appeared at a midnight rally in Florida with ...

591792_081030_obama2.jpg
591792_081030_obama2.jpg

Top Story

As if to flaunt his dominance in fundraising and in the media, Democratic nominee Barack Obama aired an unusual 30-minute advertisement on three different networks last night.

He also appeared Wednesday on ABC's World News with Charlie Gibson, The Daily Show with John Stewart, and appeared at a midnight rally in Florida with former President Bill Clinton. And he made a cameo this morning on ABC's Good Morning America.

Top Story

As if to flaunt his dominance in fundraising and in the media, Democratic nominee Barack Obama aired an unusual 30-minute advertisement on three different networks last night.

He also appeared Wednesday on ABC’s World News with Charlie Gibson, The Daily Show with John Stewart, and appeared at a midnight rally in Florida with former President Bill Clinton. And he made a cameo this morning on ABC’s Good Morning America.

John McCain, appearing on Larry King Live, said his opponent traveled “in the far left of American politics.”

The Washington Post‘s Tom Shales describes the Illinois senator’s infomercial as “a montage of montages, a series of seamlessly blended segments interweaving the stories of embattled Americans with visions of their deliverer, Guess Who.” More pundits weigh in here.

“I will not be a perfect president,” Obama said, shedding the usual “if I am elected” construction. “But I can promise you this: I will always tell you what I think and where I stand.” With the election just around the corner, Obama appears to be holding his lead in the battleground states and planning for the transition in earnest.

Economy

Citing a weakening economy, the U.S. Federal Reserve lowered the federal funds rate to 1 percent. More cuts are possible.

Meanwhile, the U.S. government is considering $500 billion in mortgage guarantees.

The IMF announced a $100 billion global bailout fund.

Japan and Germany put forth major economic stimulus packages.

Americas

Colombia’s defense ministry fired 27 military officers for alleged involvement in the deaths of a dozen civilian youth.

The Washington Post has a series of special reports on Latin America.

Shell is delaying a decision on investing in oil sands in Alberta, Canada.

Asia

Bombs killed at least 39 people in northern India.

A suicide bomber struck the Ministry of Information and Culture in Kabul.

The Afghan government’s overtures to the Taliban have “new intensity,” the New York Times reports.

More signs that China’s economy is slowing faster than expected.

Middle East and Africa

Thousands of demonstrators protested at the U.S. Embassy in Damascus.

Congo’s rebels declared a unilateral cease-fire.

South Africa’s President Thabo Mbeki agreed to resign earlier than planned.

Europe

French President Nicolas Sarkozy is a whirlwind of questionable activity.

Russia bailed out its oligarchs. Is Putin in political trouble?

Today’s Agenda

Zambia holds its presidential election.

The Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress holds a hearing as the Bureau of Economic Analysis releases third-quarter GDP numbers for the U.S. economy.

Italy’s PM Silvio Berlusconi welcomes Michel Suleiman to Rome, where the Lebanese president will also meet with Pope Benedict XVI.

Obama is campaigning in Florida, Virginia, and Missouri; McCain is visiting four towns in Ohio; Joe Biden is in Missouri and Pennsylvania, as is Sarah Palin.

Photo: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

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