Morning Brief: Judgment Day

Top Story It’s all come down to this… After the longest and most expensive election in history, U.S. voters head to the polls today to elect either Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois or Sen. John McCain of Arizona. Despite widespread early voting, record turnout is expected. The latest projections indicate a nearly insurmountable lead for ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
591743_081104_vote5.jpg
591743_081104_vote5.jpg

Top Story

It's all come down to this...

After the longest and most expensive election in history, U.S. voters head to the polls today to elect either Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois or Sen. John McCain of Arizona. Despite widespread early voting, record turnout is expected.

Top Story

It’s all come down to this

After the longest and most expensive election in history, U.S. voters head to the polls today to elect either Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois or Sen. John McCain of Arizona. Despite widespread early voting, record turnout is expected.

The latest projections indicate a nearly insurmountable lead for Obama. Pollster.com’s aggregate has Obama leading by 160 electoral votes with only 85 tossups. RealClearPolitics shows Obama ahead by 146. Nate Silver gives McCain less than a 2 percent chance of victory. InTrade’s prediction market gives him a 9.5% chance.

A state board exonerated Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin of wrongdoing in the firing of a her public safety commisioner.

Obama received the tragic news that the grandmother who helped raise him did not live to see how this election turned out.

Democrats are hoping for a big night in the senate as well with at least seven close races and the possibility of a filibuster-proof 60-seat majority within reach.

Asia

Taiwan and China signed a series of historic trade and travel agreements.

In Islamabad, Pakistani officials complained to visiting Gen. David Petraeus about U.S. airstrikes.

Americas

Two senior police officers were killed by drug cartel hitmen in Mexico.

A Venezuelan businessman was convicted in Miami for his role in last year’s “suitcasegate” scandal.

With regional elections coming up, Hugo Chavez is cranking up the rhetoric.

Middle East and Africa

A UN aid convoy entered rebel territory in Eastern Congo. UN peacekeepers are under international pressure to toughen up in response to the violence.

The bodies of 60 East African refugees washed ashore in Yemen.

Dissident members of South Africa’s African National Congress plan to start their own party.

World Economy

U.S. automobile sales suffered badly in October.

Oil fell to below $60 per barrel

Today’s Agenda:

After some last-minute campaigning, Barack Obama will be holding his election-night party in Chicago’s Grant Park. McCain will be at the Arizona Biltmore hotel in Phoenix.

U.S. readers: Don’t forget to vote.

International readers: We swear this will all be over soon.

Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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