The Gaza Strip heats up

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, following closely on Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s decision to deploy missiles near NATO’s borders, is the second international hotspot already making a bid for President-elect Barack Obama’s attention. The relative quiet that has prevailed in the Gaza Strip since June, due to a ceasefire observed by Israel and Hamas, is at risk ...

591688_081105_hamas2.jpg
591688_081105_hamas2.jpg

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, following closely on Russian President Dmitry Medvedev's decision to deploy missiles near NATO's borders, is the second international hotspot already making a bid for President-elect Barack Obama's attention. The relative quiet that has prevailed in the Gaza Strip since June, due to a ceasefire observed by Israel and Hamas, is at risk of collapsing because of renewed clashes late Tuesday night.

Fighting began when Israeli troops moved to destroy a tunnel "aimed at abducting soldiers," approximately 300 meters into Gaza. Six Palestinians were killed in the ensuing firefight between Israel Defense Force troops and Hamas gunmen. Hamas retaliated by launching more than 40 Qassam missiles and mortar shells at southern Israeli towns. Defense Minister Ehud Barak met today with senior security officials to discuss the possibility of a complete breakdown of the truce between Israel and Hamas. Amid information that Hamas has consolidated its power in Gaza, an Israeli security source claimed today that "it's hard to predict what will happen in the next 24 hours."

Someone has talked to Obama today and made sure that he still wants this job, right?

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, following closely on Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s decision to deploy missiles near NATO’s borders, is the second international hotspot already making a bid for President-elect Barack Obama’s attention. The relative quiet that has prevailed in the Gaza Strip since June, due to a ceasefire observed by Israel and Hamas, is at risk of collapsing because of renewed clashes late Tuesday night.

Fighting began when Israeli troops moved to destroy a tunnel “aimed at abducting soldiers,” approximately 300 meters into Gaza. Six Palestinians were killed in the ensuing firefight between Israel Defense Force troops and Hamas gunmen. Hamas retaliated by launching more than 40 Qassam missiles and mortar shells at southern Israeli towns. Defense Minister Ehud Barak met today with senior security officials to discuss the possibility of a complete breakdown of the truce between Israel and Hamas. Amid information that Hamas has consolidated its power in Gaza, an Israeli security source claimed today that “it’s hard to predict what will happen in the next 24 hours.”

Someone has talked to Obama today and made sure that he still wants this job, right?

Photo: SAID KHATIB/AFP/Getty Images

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