What We’re Reading

Preeti Aroon The Antelope’s Strategy: Living in Rwanda After the Genocide. How would you feel if the men who killed your family moved back to your town? Jean Hatzfeld interviews Rwanda’s genocide survivors and killers released from prison in the early 2000s in an exploration of the difficulty of reconciliation. (Note: The book will be ...

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591500_081117_rwanda2.jpg

Preeti Aroon

The Antelope's Strategy: Living in Rwanda After the Genocide. How would you feel if the men who killed your family moved back to your town? Jean Hatzfeld interviews Rwanda's genocide survivors and killers released from prison in the early 2000s in an exploration of the difficulty of reconciliation. (Note: The book will be out in March 2009; I'm reading a review copy.)

Jerome Chen

Preeti Aroon

The Antelope’s Strategy: Living in Rwanda After the Genocide. How would you feel if the men who killed your family moved back to your town? Jean Hatzfeld interviews Rwanda’s genocide survivors and killers released from prison in the early 2000s in an exploration of the difficulty of reconciliation. (Note: The book will be out in March 2009; I’m reading a review copy.)

Jerome Chen

The New York Times’ Lonely War.” In Vanity Fair‘s December issue, Seth Mnookin looks at one of the few U.S. media outlets to maintain a presence in Iraq — the Times’ Baghdad bureau. Remarking that “135 journalists have been killed there since 2003,” the Iraq War, he says, “has been, by any measure, one of the most dangerous conflicts to cover in the history of modern journalism.”

Elizabeth Dickinson

Closing Guantánamo is on the short list of top priorities for the incoming Obama administration. In Harper’sJustice after Bush: Prosecuting an Outlaw Administration,” lawyer Scott Horton imagines Bush officials standing trial and suggests a Truth and Reconciliation Commission that would trade confessions for amnesty.

Rebecca Frankel

All Options Are on the Table.” Der Spiegel talks to Israeli Air Force Maj. Gen. Ido Nehushtan about his country’s biggest military challenges and what Israel would be willing to do should Iran manage to develop nuclear weapons. “The Air Force is a very robust and flexible force,” Nehushtan says. “We are ready to do whatever is demanded of us.”

Blake Hounshell

Four active-duty officers — Lt. Col. Robert A. Downey, Lt. Col Lee K. Grubbs, Cdr. Brian J. Malloy, and Lt. Col. Craig R. Wonson — explain how a surge in Afghanistan might work for the Small Wars Journal (pdf). The bad news? It’s going to require eight brigades, or up to 40,000 additional troops.

David Kenner

Disney Set to Entertain Middle East.” The Financial Times reports that Walt Disney is making its first film marketed towards the Middle East. Because of the large number of young people in the region, and the limited number of films made targeting an Arab audience, Disney is hoping to produce a family movie that “will play to families from North Africa to the Gulf states.”

Photo: JOSE CENDON/AFP/Getty Images

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