This Week in China

Top Story Chinese President Hu Jintao was in Havana, Cuba yesterday, where he signed more than a dozen economic agreements between China and Cuba. The deals included purchases of Cuban raw materials such as nickel and sugar, a $70 million pledge to help renovate Cuban hospitals, and the postponement of debt payments that Cuba owes ...

591455_081119_castro5.jpg
591455_081119_castro5.jpg

Top Story

Chinese President Hu Jintao was in Havana, Cuba yesterday, where he signed more than a dozen economic agreements between China and Cuba. The deals included purchases of Cuban raw materials such as nickel and sugar, a $70 million pledge to help renovate Cuban hospitals, and the postponement of debt payments that Cuba owes China.

Hu also met with former Cuban President Fidel Castro, whom he praised for having struggled "to safeguard state sovereignty" and adhered "to the path of socialism, thus winning respect from people worldwide, including the Chinese people."

Top Story

Chinese President Hu Jintao was in Havana, Cuba yesterday, where he signed more than a dozen economic agreements between China and Cuba. The deals included purchases of Cuban raw materials such as nickel and sugar, a $70 million pledge to help renovate Cuban hospitals, and the postponement of debt payments that Cuba owes China.

Hu also met with former Cuban President Fidel Castro, whom he praised for having struggled “to safeguard state sovereignty” and adhered “to the path of socialism, thus winning respect from people worldwide, including the Chinese people.”

Granma, the Cuban Communist Party mouthpiece newspaper, imparted praise on China’s economic reforms the day before the visit, but also criticized the income disparities that have arisen. It will be interesting to see which of the reform precedents set by China, arguably the most important of Cuba’s communist brethren, President Raul Castro may deem appropriate for the island nation.

General News

Twenty-one people are dead after a subway tunnel under construction collapsed in the eastern city of Hangzhou.

Thousands of protesters clashed with police in northwestern Gansu province over a government plan to resettle residents. This latest in a string of unrest in western and southern China has officials concerned that forthcoming economic hardship could cause isolated incidents to spread into wider discontent.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration opened offices in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou to prescreen Chinese goods bound for the U.S.

Politics

China rejects the possibility of sending troops to Afghanistan.

Despite warming relations between China and India, India has cast suspicion on China’s growing presence in the region, especially in The Maldives.

Business & Economics

A long awaited fuel tax will soon come into effect. Proceeds are to replace road tolls as a means to fund highway construction.

China’s internet-based economy grew by 52.2 percent in the third quarter, with advertising and games making up 72.7 percent of the total income.

Science & Environment

In a bid to reduce chemical residues in milk, Chinese scientists are using herbs in place of hormones to increase milk production in cows.

A new study finds that 12 percent of Chinese children and adolescents in big cities are overweight and notes a growing rate of diabetes.

China Moment

After catching a Ningbo teenager illegally posting advertisements, officials had the boy cover his body with those advertisements as punishment. Naturally, the pictures wound up online and have sparked debat. (Hat tip: WSJ China Journal.)

ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images

Jerome Chen is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

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