Morning Brief: Nationalization for Detroit?

Top Story Congressional Democrats unveiled a $15 billion plan to bail out the struggling U.S. auto industry. Under the plan, companies would have until March 31 to submit detailed plans for restructuring their operations. Congress and the White House are still negotiating details of the plan today, but they appear to be close to a ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
591243_081209_pelosi5.jpg
591243_081209_pelosi5.jpg

Top Story

Congressional Democrats unveiled a $15 billion plan to bail out the struggling U.S. auto industry. Under the plan, companies would have until March 31 to submit detailed plans for restructuring their operations. Congress and the White House are still negotiating details of the plan today, but they appear to be close to a resolution.

The plan involves a significant oversight role for U.S. government regulators and according to the New York Times' David Sanger, comes "perilously close to a word that no one in Mr. Obama’s camp wants to be caught uttering: nationalization."

Top Story

Congressional Democrats unveiled a $15 billion plan to bail out the struggling U.S. auto industry. Under the plan, companies would have until March 31 to submit detailed plans for restructuring their operations. Congress and the White House are still negotiating details of the plan today, but they appear to be close to a resolution.

The plan involves a significant oversight role for U.S. government regulators and according to the New York Times‘ David Sanger, comes “perilously close to a word that no one in Mr. Obama’s camp wants to be caught uttering: nationalization.”

Americas

Accused 9/11 planner Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, along with his four codefendents at Guantanamo Bay, offered to plead guilty to murder and war crimes.

Some 5,400 people were killed by drug violence in Mexico this year.

Tribune Co., the publisher of the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times, filed for bankruptcy.

Asia

Pakistan will not hand over arrested Lashkar-e-Taiba militants to India.

In an upset, India’s ruling Congress party won three state elections.

North Korea’s need for food aid is increasing.

Japan’s Sony Corp. is cutting 8,000 jobs.

Middle East

Five Blackwater guards were charged with killing 14 Iraqi civilians in a 2007 shooting.

Egypt’s top cleric is under pressure to resign after he was photographed shaking hands with Israeli President Shimon Peres.

Israel’s Likud Party is running a ticket of hardliners in upcoming parliamentary elections.

Africa

Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe accused the U.S. and Britain of planning an invasion of his country in response the current cholera outbreak.

Sudan’s leaders are worried that Barack Obama will take a tougher line on Darfur.

Ghana’s ruling party holds a slim lead in the country’s election.

Europe

The EU is taking over peacekeeping operations from the U.N. in Kosovo.

Anti-police riots continue to flare throughout Greece.

Today’s Agenda

The funeral of a teenager shot by police last week is expected to provoke more rioting in Greece.

President-elect Obama will meet with Al Gore in Chicago.

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Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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