U.S. metal band happy to help torture prisoners

The AP reports on a new campaign by musicians, including Rage Against the Machine and Massive Attack, to ban the practice of using loud heavy metal, hip-hop, and even children’s songs to psychologically break down detainees for interrogation. Apparently, not every band has a problem with the practice, though. Bassist Steve Benton of Drowning Pool, ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
591170_081211_drowningpool5.jpg
591170_081211_drowningpool5.jpg

The AP reports on a new campaign by musicians, including Rage Against the Machine and Massive Attack, to ban the practice of using loud heavy metal, hip-hop, and even children's songs to psychologically break down detainees for interrogation. Apparently, not every band has a problem with the practice, though.

Bassist Steve Benton of Drowning Pool, whose 2001 hit "Bodies" is a particular favorite of interrogators, had this to say:

"People assume we should be offended that somebody in the military thinks our song is annoying enough that played over and over it can psychologically break someone down," he told Spin magazine. "I take it as an honor to think that perhaps our song could be used to quell another 9/11 attack or something like that."

The AP reports on a new campaign by musicians, including Rage Against the Machine and Massive Attack, to ban the practice of using loud heavy metal, hip-hop, and even children’s songs to psychologically break down detainees for interrogation. Apparently, not every band has a problem with the practice, though.

Bassist Steve Benton of Drowning Pool, whose 2001 hit “Bodies” is a particular favorite of interrogators, had this to say:

“People assume we should be offended that somebody in the military thinks our song is annoying enough that played over and over it can psychologically break someone down,” he told Spin magazine. “I take it as an honor to think that perhaps our song could be used to quell another 9/11 attack or something like that.”

Having only a vague recollection of these guys, I looked up Drowning Pool’s entry on AllMusic.com, which features a picture of the band posing with Barack Obama. I’m guessing that was a very weird meeting.

Photo by Scott Gries/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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