Hillary’s last legislative victory?

Clinton may get a last-minute legislative hurrah on her way out of the Senate. Two controversial bills on equal pay for women — the Ledbetter Act and the Paycheck Fairness Act, the latter of which is sponsored by Hillary — have been reintroduced and are expected to easily pass in the House today. The Ledbetter ...

589691_090109_ClintonPay2.jpg
589691_090109_ClintonPay2.jpg

Clinton may get a last-minute legislative hurrah on her way out of the Senate. Two controversial bills on equal pay for women -- the Ledbetter Act and the Paycheck Fairness Act, the latter of which is sponsored by Hillary -- have been reintroduced and are expected to easily pass in the House today. The Ledbetter bill, which reverses a Supreme Court decision, is designed to allow employees who learn of pay disparities after the fact a longer window to file formal complaints. The Paycheck Fairness bill allows employees who face salary discrimination the ability to file class-action suits and increases penalties for companies with gender pay gaps.

Both bills aren't popular with the business community and probably face a tougher time in the Senate. But they could be a satisfying capstone to Hillary's Senate career if they find their way into the lawbooks.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images News

Clinton may get a last-minute legislative hurrah on her way out of the Senate. Two controversial bills on equal pay for women — the Ledbetter Act and the Paycheck Fairness Act, the latter of which is sponsored by Hillary — have been reintroduced and are expected to easily pass in the House today. The Ledbetter bill, which reverses a Supreme Court decision, is designed to allow employees who learn of pay disparities after the fact a longer window to file formal complaints. The Paycheck Fairness bill allows employees who face salary discrimination the ability to file class-action suits and increases penalties for companies with gender pay gaps.

Both bills aren’t popular with the business community and probably face a tougher time in the Senate. But they could be a satisfying capstone to Hillary’s Senate career if they find their way into the lawbooks.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images News

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.