Hillary at Emily’s List luncheon yesterday

Over at Salon, Rebecca Traister has a great piece about yesterday’s EMILY’s List luncheon, where Hillary Clinton gave the keynote speech (more on that later). Traister’s take was that Hillary’s speech represented a rebirth of her visible feminist roots. And even without much mention of the failed presidential march of the still-senator from New York, ...

589380_090119_HillaryEmilysList3.jpg
589380_090119_HillaryEmilysList3.jpg

Over at Salon, Rebecca Traister has a great piece about yesterday's EMILY's List luncheon, where Hillary Clinton gave the keynote speech (more on that later). Traister's take was that Hillary's speech represented a rebirth of her visible feminist roots. And even without much mention of the failed presidential march of the still-senator from New York, the event was yet another in a string of recent moments in which we got to see the new Hillary Rodham Clinton: Toughened, burnished and somehow fortified by her loss, she is taking on the role not only of secretary of state, but of a reanimated, reborn, rollicking feminist superhero.

Feminist superhero? Perhaps. Although I agree with Traister about the quality of the speech, I'm not sure that Clinton is looking to break out the feminist superhero cape just yet. But more to come on the speech soon.

[Full disclosure: Traister is a friend, blogging colleague and, once, my BloggingHeads partner-in-crime. So I might be biased when I call her piece "great," but I don't think so.]

Over at Salon, Rebecca Traister has a great piece about yesterday’s EMILY’s List luncheon, where Hillary Clinton gave the keynote speech (more on that later). Traister’s take was that Hillary’s speech represented a rebirth of her visible feminist roots.

And even without much mention of the failed presidential march of the still-senator from New York, the event was yet another in a string of recent moments in which we got to see the new Hillary Rodham Clinton: Toughened, burnished and somehow fortified by her loss, she is taking on the role not only of secretary of state, but of a reanimated, reborn, rollicking feminist superhero.

Feminist superhero? Perhaps. Although I agree with Traister about the quality of the speech, I’m not sure that Clinton is looking to break out the feminist superhero cape just yet. But more to come on the speech soon.

[Full disclosure: Traister is a friend, blogging colleague and, once, my BloggingHeads partner-in-crime. So I might be biased when I call her piece “great,” but I don’t think so.]

Alex Wong/Getty Images News

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