Experience life as a refugee in Davos

On his brand new blog, Bill Easterly posts the following totally absurd invitation he received to a “refugee run” for participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos, sponsored by the UN High Comission for Refugees: Here’s what the VIPs are in for: Just five minutes’ walk from the Congress Centre, you can enter a ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
589005_090129_refugee_run5.jpg
589005_090129_refugee_run5.jpg

On his brand new blog, Bill Easterly posts the following totally absurd invitation he received to a "refugee run" for participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos, sponsored by the UN High Comission for Refugees:

Here's what the VIPs are in for:

Just five minutes' walk from the Congress Centre, you can enter a simulated environment that will thrust you into a war zone. You will meet a rebel attack, navigate a mine field and battle life in a refugee camp. (Spoiler alert: No harm will come to you!)

On his brand new blog, Bill Easterly posts the following totally absurd invitation he received to a “refugee run” for participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos, sponsored by the UN High Comission for Refugees:

Here’s what the VIPs are in for:

Just five minutes’ walk from the Congress Centre, you can enter a simulated environment that will thrust you into a war zone. You will meet a rebel attack, navigate a mine field and battle life in a refugee camp. (Spoiler alert: No harm will come to you!)

As good as UNHCR’s intentions may be, the idea of the Davos elite playing refugee between a talk by Larry Summers and an afternoon roquefort reception seems like something out of a Monty Python sketch. Easterly asks:

Can Davos man empathize with refugees when he or she is not in danger and is going back to a luxury banquet and hotel room afterwards? Isn’t this just a tad different from the life of an actual refugee, at risk of all too real rape, murder, hunger, and disease?

Perhaps Ian Bremmer could let us know.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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