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Erdogan’s Davos outburst

Davos got a bit more interesting yesterday when Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan stormed out of a panel discussion after castigating Israeli President Shimon Peres for Israel’s actions in Gaza. Erdogan was upset not just at the content of Peres’s speech but by the fact that he had apparently been given less time to ...

Davos got a bit more interesting yesterday when Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan stormed out of a panel discussion after castigating Israeli President Shimon Peres for Israel's actions in Gaza. Erdogan was upset not just at the content of Peres's speech but by the fact that he had apparently been given less time to speak.

Erdogan returned home to a hero's welcome in Turkey where he gave a press conference saying Peres's manner was "unacceptable" and blaming the panel's moderator, Washington Post reporter David Ignatius, for not allowing him to speak.  "I cannot allow anybody to harm my country's dignity and honor," Erdogan said. 

Peres says the relationship between Turkey and Israel won't be affected by the event, though Erdogan had earlier stated that Turkish moderated talks between Israel and Gaza had been "shelved" after Gaza.

Davos got a bit more interesting yesterday when Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan stormed out of a panel discussion after castigating Israeli President Shimon Peres for Israel’s actions in Gaza. Erdogan was upset not just at the content of Peres’s speech but by the fact that he had apparently been given less time to speak.

Erdogan returned home to a hero’s welcome in Turkey where he gave a press conference saying Peres’s manner was "unacceptable" and blaming the panel’s moderator, Washington Post reporter David Ignatius, for not allowing him to speak.  "I cannot allow anybody to harm my country’s dignity and honor," Erdogan said. 

Peres says the relationship between Turkey and Israel won’t be affected by the event, though Erdogan had earlier stated that Turkish moderated talks between Israel and Gaza had been "shelved" after Gaza.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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