Morning Brief: Kabul scrambles to recover

Top Story In the wake of yesterday’s Taliban attacks on three government buildings, Afghan troops are attempting to put Kabul on lockdown as U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke is due to arrive later today. All eight attackers were killed by security forces yesterday bringing the total death count to 28. A suicide bomber blew himself up ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
588593_090212_kabulgun5.jpg
588593_090212_kabulgun5.jpg

Top Story

In the wake of yesterday's Taliban attacks on three government buildings, Afghan troops are attempting to put Kabul on lockdown as U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke is due to arrive later today. All eight attackers were killed by security forces yesterday bringing the total death count to 28. A suicide bomber blew himself up outside a police station in Eastern Afghanistan earlier today.

Holbrooke is arriving from Pakistan where he visited the violent Afghan-border regions yesterday. In Pakistan, Holbrooke received a litany of requests for money and military aid as well as complaints about U.S. airstrikes in Pakistani territory. Nevertheless, writer Ahmed Rashid, who also met with Holbrooke, described the visit from a prominent U.S. civilian envoy as a "sea change in what Pakistan is used to.”

Top Story

In the wake of yesterday’s Taliban attacks on three government buildings, Afghan troops are attempting to put Kabul on lockdown as U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke is due to arrive later today. All eight attackers were killed by security forces yesterday bringing the total death count to 28. A suicide bomber blew himself up outside a police station in Eastern Afghanistan earlier today.

Holbrooke is arriving from Pakistan where he visited the violent Afghan-border regions yesterday. In Pakistan, Holbrooke received a litany of requests for money and military aid as well as complaints about U.S. airstrikes in Pakistani territory. Nevertheless, writer Ahmed Rashid, who also met with Holbrooke, described the visit from a prominent U.S. civilian envoy as a “sea change in what Pakistan is used to.”

Afghan intelligence officers are investigating links between Pakistan and yesterday’s attacks, Al Jazeera reports.

Asia

A senior Pakistani official admitted for the first time that the Mumbai attacks were partly planned in Pakistan as he announced that the ringleader and five other suspects were in custody.

China has arrested 12 people in connection with the CCTV fire.

Sri Lankan troops created a new “safe zone” for civilians and claimed to have killed 28 Tamil Tiger rebels.

Americas

U.S. House and Senate leaders reached an agreement on the stimulus package setting the stage for final approval later this week.

A panel led by three Latin American former heads of state condemned the U.S.-led war on drugs and recommended decriminalizing marijuana. 

The U.S. Senate approved Leon Panetta as the new head of the CIA.

Middle East

Israel plans to announce the final results of its election today. The military vote could be crucial.

A Netanyahu-Livni coalition is not out of the picture.

Bomb attacks against Shiite pilgrims in Iraq killed 20 yesterday.

Africa

The New York Times reports that International Criminal Court judges have approved an arrest warrant for Sudanese leader Omar al-Bashir. The ICC denies the report and says they’re still deliberating.

After being freed by Somali pirates, the Ukrainian freighter MV Faina is due to unload its military cargo in Kenya today.

Taking power as Zimbabwe’s new prime minister, Morgan Tsvangirai promised a “new chapter” for his country.

Europe

Spain has officially entered its first recession in 15 years.

The pope met with Jewish leaders and condemned Holocaust denial.

Ireland’s government announced an emergency rescue plan for the country’s banks.

Outer Space

U.S. and Russian satellites collided in the first reported incident of its kind.

Photo: SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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