Morning Brief: Kyrgyzstan to U.S: Get lost

Top Story The government of Kyrgyzstan has issued an eviction notice to U.S. troops based in the country, ordering the Manas air base closed within six months. The closure is a possible complication in the U.S. effort to increase its military presence in Afghanistan with Pakistani supply routes into the country becoming increasingly unreliable and ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
588364_090220_manas5.jpg
588364_090220_manas5.jpg

Top Story

The government of Kyrgyzstan has issued an eviction notice to U.S. troops based in the country, ordering the Manas air base closed within six months. The closure is a possible complication in the U.S. effort to increase its military presence in Afghanistan with Pakistani supply routes into the country becoming increasingly unreliable and dangerous. 15,000 troops and 500 tons of cargo are shipped into Afghanistan via Manas each month.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said the matter was "not a closed issue" and that negotiations with the Kyrgyz government over fees for using the base would continue. However, Gates described Manas as "not irreplaceable."

Top Story

The government of Kyrgyzstan has issued an eviction notice to U.S. troops based in the country, ordering the Manas air base closed within six months. The closure is a possible complication in the U.S. effort to increase its military presence in Afghanistan with Pakistani supply routes into the country becoming increasingly unreliable and dangerous. 15,000 troops and 500 tons of cargo are shipped into Afghanistan via Manas each month.

U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said the matter was “not a closed issue” and that negotiations with the Kyrgyz government over fees for using the base would continue. However, Gates described Manas as “not irreplaceable.”

The U.S. has also secured the rights to transport non-lethal cargo into Afghanistan via Uzbekistan, an agreement that may raise human rights concerns.

Middle East

Israeli President Shimon Peres has asked Likud candidate Binyamin Netanyahu to form a government. Kadima’s Tzipi Livni has indicated she would rather remain in opposition than join a government led by Netanyahu.

IAEA inspectors found the Iran has far more enriched uranium than previously thought. They found evidence of uranium enrichment in Syria as well.

The BBC reports that Iran offered to stop attacks on British troops in Iraq in exchange for concessions on its nuclear program.

Americas

Texas billionaire Allen Stanford was served fraud charges in Virginia. Venezuela seized one of his banks yesterday.

Meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Steven Harper, Barack Obama tried to allay fears about protectionist measures in the U.S. stimulus package.

President Felipe Calderon gave a speech defending Mexico’s military operation against drug trafficking.

Asia

A suicide bombing killed 28 in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton issued a stern warning to North Korea during her visit to Seoul.

As an emergency measure, the Bank of Japan will buy $10 billion in corporate bonds.

Africa

The military has retaken ministries that were seized by opposition protesters in Madagascar’s capital.

While attention has focused on Somalia, pirate attacks have been on the rise in West Africa as well.

Zimbabwe’s Robert Mugabe has packed his cabinet with 61 ministers.

Europe

The Eurozone is plunging headlong into a deep recession, new data shows.

After three suspects were acquitted yesterday, a judge ordered a new investigation into the murder of Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya.

The British cricket world has been badly shaken by the prosecution of Allen Stanford, one of its primary financiers.

VYACHESLAV OSELEDKO/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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