Highlights from ForeignPolicy.com this week

Here at FP, we spent most of the week surrounded by cardboard and bubble wrap as we prepared to move into our swank new headquarters. But between sorting ancient office supplies  and torturing our amazingly good-natured research assistants, we managed to have a great week for Web content. The latest controverisal appointment: The Cable‘s Laura ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
588143_090227_boxes5.jpg
588143_090227_boxes5.jpg

Here at FP, we spent most of the week surrounded by cardboard and bubble wrap as we prepared to move into our swank new headquarters. But between sorting ancient office supplies  and torturing our amazingly good-natured research assistants, we managed to have a great week for Web content.

The latest controverisal appointment: The Cable's Laura Rozen originally broke the story of Chas Freeman's appointment to head the National Intelligence Council and was all over the controversy about his views and affiliations. Passport had more details and David Rothkopf stood up for the controversial pick.

Here at FP, we spent most of the week surrounded by cardboard and bubble wrap as we prepared to move into our swank new headquarters. But between sorting ancient office supplies  and torturing our amazingly good-natured research assistants, we managed to have a great week for Web content.

The latest controverisal appointment: The Cable‘s Laura Rozen originally broke the story of Chas Freeman’s appointment to head the National Intelligence Council and was all over the controversy about his views and affiliations. Passport had more details and David Rothkopf stood up for the controversial pick.

The Speech: Rothkopf and Chris Brose loved Barack Obama’s address to Congress, but Peter Feaver thought he was ducking a discussion of national security.

A little advice: Brazil’s former president, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, told FP why it’s time to end the war on drugs; Steve Walt imagined what advice Winston Churchill might have for Obama; and Dan Drezner told the WTO it should really consider getting some nuclear weapons. 

High-carb blogging: Passport examined the threat facing German pretzels and Palestinian pasta.

Reinvention: This week’s photo essay looked at the new and improved Abu Ghraib and journalist James Card exposed how South Korea’s infamous clone doctor has found a bizarre new line of work.

Cell phone photography by Joshua Keating

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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