Clinton’s Middle East and Europe trip in photos

A photo summary of Secretary Clinton’s trip to the Middle East and Europe last week: Egypt: Clinton speaks with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal prior to the international donors’ conference on Gaza in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh on March 2. Clinton said that aid to rebuild war-battered Gaza cannot be separated from ...

587955_090309_HRCEgypt2.jpg
587955_090309_HRCEgypt2.jpg

A photo summary of Secretary Clinton's trip to the Middle East and Europe last week:

Egypt: Clinton speaks with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal prior to the international donors' conference on Gaza in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh on March 2. Clinton said that aid to rebuild war-battered Gaza cannot be separated from the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

A photo summary of Secretary Clinton’s trip to the Middle East and Europe last week:

Egypt: Clinton speaks with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal prior to the international donors’ conference on Gaza in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh on March 2. Clinton said that aid to rebuild war-battered Gaza cannot be separated from the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

Israel: Clinton lays a wreath in memory of Jews who died during the Holocaust during her March 3 visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial’s Hall of Remembrance in Jerusalem.

Palestinian territories: Clinton talks with Palestinian students at the English Access Microscholarship Program on March 4 in the West Bank city of Ramallah. The U.S. State Department has been funding the two-year program for disadvantaged Palestinian youth for the past five years. The program teaches adolescents English skills and gives them an understanding of American culture and democratic values.

Belgium: Turkish Foreign Minister Ali Babacan, left, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband, and Clinton dine at the Egmont Palace in Brussels on March 4. The following day, Clinton attended an informal meeting of foreign ministers from NATO countries.

Switzerland: Clinton gives Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov a “reset button” on March 6, 2009, in Geneva. The gag gift was in reference to U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden’s comment that the United States and Russia need to “press the reset button” on their relationship. Unfortunately, the gift was “lost in translation,” the New York Times reported.

Turkey: On March 7 in Ankara, Clinton sips tea on Turkish TV talk show Come and Join Us, which is similar to the U.S. show The View, according to the Christian Science Monitor. Turks strongly opposed the Iraq war, and in 2003 Turkey refused to open a northern front to Iraq from its territory for U.S.-led forces, leading to a chill in relations between Ankara and Washington.

Top to bottom: CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP/Getty Images, David Silverman/Getty Images, David Furst – Pool/Getty Images, DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images, FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images, OSMAN ORSAL/AFP/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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