Will Hillary be dining on tacos tonight?

Secretary Clinton will begin her day with the president of the Pacific island country of Palau, which — if you’ve been paying attention to the FP quizzes –is one of seven countries that uses the U.S. dollar as its official currency and is one of 24 countries that does not have a standing army. She ...

Secretary Clinton will begin her day with the president of the Pacific island country of Palau, which -- if you've been paying attention to the FP quizzes --is one of seven countries that uses the U.S. dollar as its official currency and is one of 24 countries that does not have a standing army.

Secretary Clinton will begin her day with the president of the Pacific island country of Palau, which — if you’ve been paying attention to the FP quizzes –is one of seven countries that uses the U.S. dollar as its official currency and is one of 24 countries that does not have a standing army.

She wraps up her day with a Mexico-themed dinner. As you may be aware, the State Department recently issued a travel alert for U.S. citizens traveling to Mexico. The drug-related violence there is spinning out of control. It might even have some American college students thinking twice about their spring break plans, as described in my most recent FP photo essay, "Spring Break Gone Wrong?"

11 a.m. Courtesy call by His Excellency Johnson Toribiong, president of the Republic of Palau
 
11:30 a.m. Remarks and Q&A at Women’s History Month celebration
 
2:30 p.m. Attend the president’s bilateral with His Excellency Yang Jiechi, minister of foreign affairs of the People’s Republic of China, at the White House

5:15 p.m. Meeting with President Obama at the White House

6 p.m. Policy dinner: Mexico

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP
Tag: Mexico

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