Who’s hot and who’s not at the G20

With three weeks to go until the G20 Summit, the British government is assiduously preparing to host the world’s leaders. It’s beefing up security. It’s passing out press credentials. And, like any shrewd party host, as shown by a memo obtained by the Financial Times, it’s naming the in-crowd. The document solicits bids from public ...

587779_090313_G20leaders5.jpg
587779_090313_G20leaders5.jpg
BERLIN - FEBRUARY 22: German Chancellor Angela Merkel come together for a family photo after a meeting of European Union leaders at the Chancellery on February 22, 2009 in Berlin, Germany. The one-day meeting is taking place ahead of the G20 summit scheduled for April in London, where the leaders of the G20 nations are to discuss common measures on combating the current global economic slowdown and restructuring the world finance system. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

With three weeks to go until the G20 Summit, the British government is assiduously preparing to host the world's leaders. It's beefing up security. It's passing out press credentials. And, like any shrewd party host, as shown by a memo obtained by the Financial Times, it's naming the in-crowd.

The document solicits bids from public relations firms, asking them to help create "moments of drama for the media" around the Summit. In a section entitled "Target Audiences," it splits the G20 countries into "tier one" and "tier two," spelling out who's worth some extra attention.

With three weeks to go until the G20 Summit, the British government is assiduously preparing to host the world’s leaders. It’s beefing up security. It’s passing out press credentials. And, like any shrewd party host, as shown by a memo obtained by the Financial Times, it’s naming the in-crowd.

The document solicits bids from public relations firms, asking them to help create “moments of drama for the media” around the Summit. In a section entitled “Target Audiences,” it splits the G20 countries into “tier one” and “tier two,” spelling out who’s worth some extra attention.

Early indications suggest that the following are our priority countries and will be the focus of intensive diplomatic lobbying and engagement:

  • US, Japan, France, Germany (key G8 countries) and Italy (as next G8 President)
  • China, India
  • South Africa (as the only African nation)
  • South Korea (as the Chair of the G20 after the UK)
  • Brazil (as the main South American nation)
  • Saudi Arabia (as the only Middle East nation)

Tier 2 countries include other G20 members, non G20 countries, regional groups and developing countries.

Who falls into “tier two”? Russia, Australia, Argentina, Mexico, Indonesia, Turkey, and Canada.

A Tory spokesman immediately responded:

“The downgrading of some participants before they have even set foot in London sends completely the wrong message. In particular it is wrong for Commonwealth countries such as Australia and Canada to be put into the so-called second tier. So too are some of the world’s developing countries whose people will potentially be among those hardest hit by the global crisis.”

Looks like its Gordon Brown’s turn to be called an ungracious host.

Photo: Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Annie Lowrey is assistant editor at FP.

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