What a coup looks like

Some fantastic (and alarming) pictures emerging from the coup that isn’t officially a coup in Madagascar… Soldiers loyal to the opposition broke into the office of the president, who had earlier sought refuge outside the capital. The president has now officially stepped down, handing over the reins to the military until the political crisis can ...

By , International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.
587683_090317_madagascar12.jpg
587683_090317_madagascar12.jpg
Madagascar soldiers loyal to Andry Rajoelina Madagascar opposition leader attempt to break down an office door during the take-over inside the office of the President Marc Ravalomanana in Antananarivo on March 16, 2009 as Ravalomanana stays in another palace. Madagascar's opposition leader called today for the arrest of the island's president, whose grip on power hung by a thread while he hunkered down in his palace with a depleted guard. Andry Rajoelina urged the Indian Ocean nation's security forces to arrest President Marc Ravalomanana for treason during a rally attended by thousands in the capital Antananarivo.AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/Getty Images)

Some fantastic (and alarming) pictures emerging from the coup that isn't officially a coup in Madagascar...

Soldiers loyal to the opposition broke into the office of the president, who had earlier sought refuge outside the capital. The president has now officially stepped down, handing over the reins to the military until the political crisis can be resolved.

The soldiers used tanks in the military take over of the presidential offices as well as the central bank.

Some fantastic (and alarming) pictures emerging from the coup that isn’t officially a coup in Madagascar…

Soldiers loyal to the opposition broke into the office of the president, who had earlier sought refuge outside the capital. The president has now officially stepped down, handing over the reins to the military until the political crisis can be resolved.

The soldiers used tanks in the military take over of the presidential offices as well as the central bank.

Crowds have filled the streets of the capital in Antananarivo.

Meanwhile, opposition leader Andry Rajoelina is living up the moment… he better enjoy it, as governing the now divided country will not be nearly as fun as his former gig as a radio DJ. 

Elizabeth Dickinson is International Crisis Group’s senior analyst for Colombia.

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