Passport

The Irish prime minister’s unofficial portrait problem

Various British and Irish news outlets report that two Dublin museums unexpectedly acquired new nudes — of Irish Prime Minister Brian Cowen. A guerrilla artist, using a trick popularized by grafitti-artist Banksy, placed portraits of the taoiseach in the Royal Hibernian and National Galleries. In one, he’s holding his underwear; in the other, he’s in ...

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Various British and Irish news outlets report that two Dublin museums unexpectedly acquired new nudes — of Irish Prime Minister Brian Cowen.

A guerrilla artist, using a trick popularized by grafitti-artist Banksy, placed portraits of the taoiseach in the Royal Hibernian and National Galleries. In one, he’s holding his underwear; in the other, he’s in the loo. In both, he’s nude, though depicted in classically chaste poses. 

Irish police immediately confiscated the paintings and announced a public search for the offending, offensive artist — although it’s unclear that he or she committed any crime at all. Except against good taste, perhaps. 

Various British and Irish news outlets report that two Dublin museums unexpectedly acquired new nudes — of Irish Prime Minister Brian Cowen.

A guerrilla artist, using a trick popularized by grafitti-artist Banksy, placed portraits of the taoiseach in the Royal Hibernian and National Galleries. In one, he’s holding his underwear; in the other, he’s in the loo. In both, he’s nude, though depicted in classically chaste poses. 

Irish police immediately confiscated the paintings and announced a public search for the offending, offensive artist — although it’s unclear that he or she committed any crime at all. Except against good taste, perhaps. 

Annie Lowrey is assistant editor at FP.

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