What We’re Reading

Preeti Aroon Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa, by Dambisa Moyo. Zambian-born economist Moyo argues that foreign aid to Africa should be cut off in five years. Her point — that aid does more harm than good — is convincing: Billions of aid dollars haven’t ...

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587330_090330_WWRBB5.jpg

Preeti Aroon

Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa, by Dambisa Moyo. Zambian-born economist Moyo argues that foreign aid to Africa should be cut off in five years. Her point -- that aid does more harm than good -- is convincing: Billions of aid dollars haven't produced much bang for the buck and have, in fact, promoted dependency and corruption. While the book could use some editing, I recommend it. Moyo gets bonus points for mentioning FP Editor in Chief Moisés Naím on page 107.

Elizabeth Dickinson

Preeti Aroon

Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa, by Dambisa Moyo. Zambian-born economist Moyo argues that foreign aid to Africa should be cut off in five years. Her point — that aid does more harm than good — is convincing: Billions of aid dollars haven’t produced much bang for the buck and have, in fact, promoted dependency and corruption. While the book could use some editing, I recommend it. Moyo gets bonus points for mentioning FP Editor in Chief Moisés Naím on page 107.

Elizabeth Dickinson

Long-time Africa journalist Alec Russell’s forthcoming portrait of South Africa at a crossroads — Bring Me My Machine Gun: The Battle for the Soul of South Africa from Mandela to Zuma — traces that country’s recent history since the end of apartheid. Despite the incredible challenges overcome, the task before an increasingly turbulent South Africa could prove even greater. 

Rebecca Frankel

“The Swastika and the Cedar,” Vanity Fair. In his own words, Christopher Hitchens details his experience in Lebanon — the rally, the swastika, and the brawl

Joshua Keating

Two amazing real-life heist stories: Wired‘s Joshua Davis scores the first jailhouse interview with the man behind a $100 million diamond heist in 2003 and hears a yarn involving Hasidic criminal masterminds, guys named “the monster” and “the king of keys,” and a twist ending involving a salami sandwich. But that’s nothing compared with this Spiegel story about two German identical twins who may have just pulled off the perfect crime. (Hat tip: Kottke for both.)

Christina Larson

Two dispatches from the far-flung reaches of the Google empire: In China, and nowhere else in the world, the search engine has begun to offer links to free music downloads. Meanwhile, armchair conservationists across the globe are using Google Earth to track and publicize environmental threats — from forest fires in Brazil to illegal fisherman off the Canary Islands.

Annie Lowrey

I’m part of a little book club currently reading finance-fiction: The Great Gatsby, Bonfire of the Vanities, and American Psycho. Anyone have any other suggestions for the best novels on Wall Street and its excesses? Post in comments.

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
 

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