Heckuva job, Karzai

Looks like the Afghan government has given European countries the perfect excuse to justify their unwillingness to ante up: Nato’s head says it could be difficult to persuade European countries to contribute more troops to Afghanistan because of controversial new laws. Jaap de Hoop Scheffer said the planned laws violated human rights and were unjustifiable ...

587127_090403_karzai12.jpg
587127_090403_karzai12.jpg
Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai points to a journalist as he addresses a press conference at The Presidential Palace in Kabul on March 28, 2009. The new US strategy to fight extremism and bring stability to Afghanistan is better than had been expected, Afghan President Hamid Karzai said, committing his government to the plan. US President Barack Obama announced the strategy following a major review more than seven years after Washington launched its "war on terror" with the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan to oust the Taliban regime. AFP PHOTO/Massoud HOSSAINI (Photo credit should read MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Looks like the Afghan government has given European countries the perfect excuse to justify their unwillingness to ante up:

Nato's head says it could be difficult to persuade European countries to contribute more troops to Afghanistan because of controversial new laws.

Jaap de Hoop Scheffer said the planned laws violated human rights and were unjustifiable when Nato troops were dying to protect universal values.

Looks like the Afghan government has given European countries the perfect excuse to justify their unwillingness to ante up:

Nato’s head says it could be difficult to persuade European countries to contribute more troops to Afghanistan because of controversial new laws.

Jaap de Hoop Scheffer said the planned laws violated human rights and were unjustifiable when Nato troops were dying to protect universal values.

Critics say the law limits the rights of women from the Shia minority and authorises rape within marriage.

MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images

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