Jail time for Indian cell-phone pests

A committee of India’s parliament has recommended that laws be enacted to crack down on annoying cell phone users, including fines and prison sentences: The comments came in response to a petition filed by Gurjit Singh, a member of the public whose demands include making carrying mobiles at funerals and temples illegal and the installation ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
587055_090406_cellphone2.jpg
587055_090406_cellphone2.jpg
TO GO WITH PARUL GUPTA'S STORY Indian rickshaw puller Vinod talks on his mobile phone in New Delhi, 24 September 2007. Mobile phone connections in the country topped 200 million this month, with 8.31 million wireless subscribers. The growth is being driven almost entirely by lower-income groups, as prices of handsets and calls -- some of the lowest in the world -- decline. AFP PHOTO / Prakash SINGH (Photo credit should read PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images)

A committee of India's parliament has recommended that laws be enacted to crack down on annoying cell phone users, including fines and prison sentences:

The comments came in response to a petition filed by Gurjit Singh, a member of the public whose demands include making carrying mobiles at funerals and temples illegal and the installation of mobile phone jammers on school buildings to stop students making calls.

Mr Singh also wants phone companies to deploy equipment to disable mobiles on the roads to avoid traffic accidents, and is calling for a law under which civil servants could be imprisoned if they make personal calls on their handsets during office hours.

A committee of India’s parliament has recommended that laws be enacted to crack down on annoying cell phone users, including fines and prison sentences:

The comments came in response to a petition filed by Gurjit Singh, a member of the public whose demands include making carrying mobiles at funerals and temples illegal and the installation of mobile phone jammers on school buildings to stop students making calls.

Mr Singh also wants phone companies to deploy equipment to disable mobiles on the roads to avoid traffic accidents, and is calling for a law under which civil servants could be imprisoned if they make personal calls on their handsets during office hours.

His final demand is that mobile phones fitted with cameras be outlawed “for the safety of women”.

 PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: India

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.