Friday Photo: Bangkok returns to abnormal

Thais enjoy the water festival called Songkran as the capital city attempts to get back to normal April 15, 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand’s government announced that it has revoked the personal passport of ousted and exiled Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra following several days of demonstrations that paralyzed Bangkok. The move comes a day after ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
586625_090417_bangkok2.jpg
586625_090417_bangkok2.jpg
BANGKOK, THAILAND - APRIL 15: Thais enjoy the water festival called Songkran as the capital city attempts to get back to normal April 15, 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's government announced that it has revoked the personal passport of ousted and exiled Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra following several days of demonstrations that paralyzed Bangkok. The move comes a day after protests led by Thaksin's supporters ended in the face of a mounting military crackdown. The demonstrations forced the cancellation of a major Asian summit, paralyzed the capital for days and leaving two dead and 123 injured before leaders called them off. (Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Thais enjoy the water festival called Songkran as the capital city attempts to get back to normal April 15, 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's government announced that it has revoked the personal passport of ousted and exiled Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra following several days of demonstrations that paralyzed Bangkok. The move comes a day after protests led by Thaksin's supporters ended in the face of a mounting military crackdown. The demonstrations forced the cancellation of a major Asian summit, paralyzed the capital for days and leaving two dead and 123 injured before leaders called them off.

Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Thais enjoy the water festival called Songkran as the capital city attempts to get back to normal April 15, 2009 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand’s government announced that it has revoked the personal passport of ousted and exiled Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra following several days of demonstrations that paralyzed Bangkok. The move comes a day after protests led by Thaksin’s supporters ended in the face of a mounting military crackdown. The demonstrations forced the cancellation of a major Asian summit, paralyzed the capital for days and leaving two dead and 123 injured before leaders called them off.

Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.