Shadow Government

A front-row seat to the Republicans' debate over foreign policy, including their critique of the Biden administration.

Grading Obama’s first 100 days: Kori Schake

I would give him a C-. The administration set a politically-expedient timeline for abandoning Iraq with no hedge against resurgent violence or challenges to what we and the Iraqis have achieved in this most important of the wars we are fighting. Their Afghan "strategy" is just an increase in military force without the civilian personnel ...

I would give him a C-.

I would give him a C-.

The administration set a politically-expedient timeline for abandoning Iraq with no hedge against resurgent violence or challenges to what we and the Iraqis have achieved in this most important of the wars we are fighting. Their Afghan "strategy" is just an increase in military force without the civilian personnel or politico-economic lines of operations necessary to succeed. The G20 and NATO summits were a bust — the president failing to get cooperation on stabilizing the global economy or increased effort in Afghanistan. All they could wring out of the UN after a provocative missile test by North Korea was a statement, while the president was proclaiming that actions must have consequences. The Obama administration has improved the atmospherics of foreign policy, but only by apologizing for us and asking for nothing from others.

Most importantly, though, the president submitted a budget that will double the national debt and raise government debt to 85 percent of GDP by 2017. That’s by their own calculations. If one applies less hope and more economics to their predictions about the pace of recovery, it’s red ink as far as the eye can see. This is the single most damaging thing the president could do to American power.

Kori Schake

Kori Schake is the director of foreign and defense policy at the American Enterprise Institute, a former U.S. government official in foreign and security policy, and the author of America vs the West: Can the Liberal World Order Be Preserved? Twitter: @KoriSchake

More from Foreign Policy

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping give a toast during a reception following their talks at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 21.

Can Russia Get Used to Being China’s Little Brother?

The power dynamic between Beijing and Moscow has switched dramatically.

Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.
Xi and Putin shake hands while carrying red folders.

Xi and Putin Have the Most Consequential Undeclared Alliance in the World

It’s become more important than Washington’s official alliances today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.
Russian President Vladimir Putin greets Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

It’s a New Great Game. Again.

Across Central Asia, Russia’s brand is tainted by Ukraine, China’s got challenges, and Washington senses another opening.

Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.
Kurdish military officers take part in a graduation ceremony in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdistan Region, on Jan. 15.

Iraqi Kurdistan’s House of Cards Is Collapsing

The region once seemed a bright spot in the disorder unleashed by U.S. regime change. Today, things look bleak.