Your Korean cloning news roundup

 Three years after the country’s preeminent scientist was caught falsifying data about the cloning of human stem cells, South Korea has decided to once again allow stem cell research. Dr. Hwang Woo-suk’s stem cell research license was revolked in 2006 after he published fake data on his cloning research. A new team has now successfully ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
586277_090429_dogclone2.jpg
586277_090429_dogclone2.jpg
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - DECEMBER 18: Genetically identical Afghan hound clones play together at the Seoul National University on December 18, 2006 in Seoul, South Korea. Lee Byeong-Chun (C) a veterinary professor of Seoul National University and former key collaborator of disgraced South Korean cloning scientist Hwang Woo-suk, claimed Monday that he succeeded in cloning a female dog, following last year's breakthrough of creating the world's first cloned dog, which was male. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

 Three years after the country's preeminent scientist was caught falsifying data about the cloning of human stem cells, South Korea has decided to once again allow stem cell research. Dr. Hwang Woo-suk's stem cell research license was revolked in 2006 after he published fake data on his cloning research. A new team has now successfully applied for a license to conduct research on cloning stem cells.

Since his fall from grace, Hwang has found a second career in cloning dogs for bereaved pet owners (his breakthroughs on dog cloning (such as the guy in the picture) were the real thing) as James Card reported for FP in February.

This brings us to today's other big South Korean cloning story. One of Hwangs former assistants announced today that he had successfully cloned dogs that glow in the dark. In addition to the novelty, this is apparently an important medical breakthrough:

 Three years after the country’s preeminent scientist was caught falsifying data about the cloning of human stem cells, South Korea has decided to once again allow stem cell research. Dr. Hwang Woo-suk’s stem cell research license was revolked in 2006 after he published fake data on his cloning research. A new team has now successfully applied for a license to conduct research on cloning stem cells.

Since his fall from grace, Hwang has found a second career in cloning dogs for bereaved pet owners (his breakthroughs on dog cloning (such as the guy in the picture) were the real thing) as James Card reported for FP in February.

This brings us to today’s other big South Korean cloning story. One of Hwangs former assistants announced today that he had successfully cloned dogs that glow in the dark. In addition to the novelty, this is apparently an important medical breakthrough:

The glowing dogs show that it is possible to successfully insert genes with a specific trait, which could lead to implanting other, non-fluorescent genes that could help treat specific diseases, Lee said.

Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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