A thousand envoys bloom…

Every so often, I find time to write for other publications. I am not sure how I actually do this given my day job, periodic need for food, sleep requirements, and other constraints. (Perhaps like Mighty Manfred the Wonder Dog from the cartoons of my youth, I have learned to eat while I sleep and ...

586166_090504_rothB2.jpg
586166_090504_rothB2.jpg

Every so often, I find time to write for other publications. I am not sure how I actually do this given my day job, periodic need for food, sleep requirements, and other constraints. (Perhaps like Mighty Manfred the Wonder Dog from the cartoons of my youth, I have learned to eat while I sleep and sleep while I eat. Certainly, I have been working in that direction my entire life.)

In any event, when those wonderful folks over at The National Interest asked if I would write a few words about the current state of the Obama national security team and what we might glean from it, I could hardly resist. (Perhaps there is a vaccine that will help build up resistance in this respect. I suspect that my wife is currently working with the National Institutes of Health to develop one.) The result is an article in the current issue called "A Thousand Envoys Bloom." 

Every so often, I find time to write for other publications. I am not sure how I actually do this given my day job, periodic need for food, sleep requirements, and other constraints. (Perhaps like Mighty Manfred the Wonder Dog from the cartoons of my youth, I have learned to eat while I sleep and sleep while I eat. Certainly, I have been working in that direction my entire life.)

In any event, when those wonderful folks over at The National Interest asked if I would write a few words about the current state of the Obama national security team and what we might glean from it, I could hardly resist. (Perhaps there is a vaccine that will help build up resistance in this respect. I suspect that my wife is currently working with the National Institutes of Health to develop one.) The result is an article in the current issue called “A Thousand Envoys Bloom.” 

I commend it to you…because if I don’t, who will? And they actually do make an effort to run a thought-provoking journal over there at The National Interest which is no small feat given just what is entailed by successfully provoking thoughts here in Washington. (To be honest, I am not even in Washington as I write this. I am in Boston to give a speech. Here they are concerned with the fact that their newspaper, the Globe, is hanging by a thread having missed a negotiating deadline last night. Oddly, the Federal government does not seem as concerned with stepping in to save journalism as they are automobile production. Go figure.)

Scott Olson/Getty Images

David Rothkopf is visiting professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs and visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. His latest book is The Great Questions of Tomorrow. He has been a longtime contributor to Foreign Policy and was CEO and editor of the FP Group from 2012 to May 2017. Twitter: @djrothkopf

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