Morning Brief: Af-Pak frustration

Top Story After two days of talks between U.S. President Barack Obama, Pakistani President Asif Ali Zaradari, and Afgan President Hamid Karzai, the three leaders committed to a joint fight against the Taliban, but there was little discussion of specifics. The United States’ main demand of Pakistan — that the country should move troops from ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
586035_090507_afpak2.jpg
586035_090507_afpak2.jpg
WASHINGTON - MAY 06: US President Barack Obama speaks while flanked by Afghan President Hamid Karzai (L) and Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari (R) after trilateral talks at the White House May 6, 2009 in Washington, DC. The talks centered on how the unstable governments in Afghanistan and Pakistan can work with the United States to crack down on the Taliban insurgency. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Top Story

After two days of talks between U.S. President Barack Obama, Pakistani President Asif Ali Zaradari, and Afgan President Hamid Karzai, the three leaders committed to a joint fight against the Taliban, but there was little discussion of specifics. The United States' main demand of Pakistan -- that the country should move troops from its eastern border with India to fight the Taliban in the west -- remains unmet.

Meanwhile, the Red Cross has warned of a humanitarian crisis in Pakistan where more than 500,000 people may have been displaced by the fighting in the areas of Swat, Dir, and Buner. Pakistani jets are continuing airstrikes on Swat today.

Top Story

After two days of talks between U.S. President Barack Obama, Pakistani President Asif Ali Zaradari, and Afgan President Hamid Karzai, the three leaders committed to a joint fight against the Taliban, but there was little discussion of specifics. The United States’ main demand of Pakistan — that the country should move troops from its eastern border with India to fight the Taliban in the west — remains unmet.

Meanwhile, the Red Cross has warned of a humanitarian crisis in Pakistan where more than 500,000 people may have been displaced by the fighting in the areas of Swat, Dir, and Buner. Pakistani jets are continuing airstrikes on Swat today.

Asia

Middle East

  • Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas plans to ask his prime minister to form a new government this week. 
  • The Baghdad operations contract for the company formerly known as Blackwater has expired.
  • Arab foreign ministers are meeting in Cairo to discuss a joint strategy for the Mideast peace process.

Americas

  • Brazil is struggling to get aid to areas affected by floods. 200,000 have been forced to flee.
  • Foreign bidders are lining up to buy off parts of struggling General Motors.
  • With swine flu declining, students are beginning to return to schools in Mexico.

Europe

Africa

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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