Marc Lynch

Abuaardvark tries to figure out whether there’s a point to Twitter

 For those who care:  I’ve decided to try once more to figure out the point of Twitter, mainly because my friend Ethan Zuckerman has been doing such fascinating work on tracking the flow of information. If I’m going to be on the site, might as well use it too.  This has absolutely nothing to do ...

 For those who care:  I’ve decided to try once more to figure out the point of Twitter, mainly because my friend Ethan Zuckerman has been doing such fascinating work on tracking the flow of information. If I’m going to be on the site, might as well use it too.  This has absolutely nothing to do with wanting to follow Eliza Dushku (who’s in Africa, in case you were wondering).   Can’t promise that it will last, or that it will be remotely interesting, but for now feel free to check out the feed at abuaardvark. 

 For those who care:  I’ve decided to try once more to figure out the point of Twitter, mainly because my friend Ethan Zuckerman has been doing such fascinating work on tracking the flow of information. If I’m going to be on the site, might as well use it too.  This has absolutely nothing to do with wanting to follow Eliza Dushku (who’s in Africa, in case you were wondering).   Can’t promise that it will last, or that it will be remotely interesting, but for now feel free to check out the feed at abuaardvark. 

Marc Lynch is associate professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, where he is the director of the Institute for Middle East Studies and of the Project on Middle East Political Science. He is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security. He is the author of The Arab Uprising (March 2012, PublicAffairs).

He publishes frequently on the politics of the Middle East, with a particular focus on the Arab media and information technology, Iraq, Jordan, Egypt, and Islamist movements. Twitter: @abuaardvark

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