Opposition leader calls Saakashvili “insane”

Judging by opposition leader Salome Zurabishvil’s interview with Der Spiegel, I’d say the chances of Georgia’s current political crisis ending with a compromise are pretty minimal: We were expecting a real dialogue with the president. A genuine dialogue about how we were going to find a way out of this political crisis. Unfortunately he was ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.

Judging by opposition leader Salome Zurabishvil's interview with Der Spiegel, I'd say the chances of Georgia's current political crisis ending with a compromise are pretty minimal:

Judging by opposition leader Salome Zurabishvil’s interview with Der Spiegel, I’d say the chances of Georgia’s current political crisis ending with a compromise are pretty minimal:

We were expecting a real dialogue with the president. A genuine dialogue about how we were going to find a way out of this political crisis. Unfortunately he was not prepared for such a talk. He seems to have lost his grip on reality and imagines that 65 percent of the population support him. He says the only crisis in Georgia is the aftermath of the worldwide economic crisis.

SPIEGEL ONLINE: And which crisis are you referring to?

Zurabishvili: The political crisis in this country has been going on for about a year and a half. Since 2007, the people have been protesting against Saakashvili’s increasingly authoritarian regime. There is no way of expressing this dissatisfaction democratically: elections were manipulated, parliament cannot be moved. Referenda or impeachment proceedings wouldn’t stand a chance because in this country all power is concentrated in the hands of one man. And I would call him insane. 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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