Hillary Clinton asks you to text ‘swat’ to 20222

Hillary Clinton, Jan. 7, 2009 Secretary Clinton, the e-diplomat, is asking Americans to pick up their cellphones and text “swat” to 20222 to make a $5 donation that will provide medicine, tents, food, and clothing to the astounding 1.17 million internal refugees who have fled the current fighting in Pakistan (mainly in the Swat Valley). The ...

585675_090520_ClintonTexting1672.jpg
585675_090520_ClintonTexting1672.jpg
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), Assistant Senate Majority Leader Dick Durbin (D-IL), Democratic Conference Vice Chairman Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Democratic Conference Secretary Patty Murray (D-WA) hold a news conference outlining Democratic priorities for the 111th Congress at the U.S. Capitol January 7, 2009 in Washington, DC. The Democratic leaders talked about reviving the economy, protecting homeowners and consumers, energy independence, national security and improving health care and educational opportunities.

Secretary Clinton, the e-diplomat, is asking Americans to pick up their cellphones and text "swat" to 20222 to make a $5 donation that will provide medicine, tents, food, and clothing to the astounding 1.17 million internal refugees who have fled the current fighting in Pakistan (mainly in the Swat Valley). The aid will be provided through the United Nations' refugee agency.

Clinton made the appeal for donations while announcing that the United States will be providing $110 million in emergency aid to the refugees. Including the 555,000 Pakistanis who were displaced during fighting last August, Pakistan now has nearly 2 million internally displaced people.

You can see photos of what Pakistanis in the Swat Valley are going through in my March photo essay: "Pakistan's New Homeless."

Hillary Clinton, Jan. 7, 2009

Hillary Clinton, Jan. 7, 2009
Secretary Clinton, the e-diplomat, is asking Americans to pick up their cellphones and text “swat” to 20222 to make a $5 donation that will provide medicine, tents, food, and clothing to the astounding 1.17 million internal refugees who have fled the current fighting in Pakistan (mainly in the Swat Valley). The aid will be provided through the United Nations’ refugee agency.

Clinton made the appeal for donations while announcing that the United States will be providing $110 million in emergency aid to the refugees. Including the 555,000 Pakistanis who were displaced during fighting last August, Pakistan now has nearly 2 million internally displaced people.

You can see photos of what Pakistanis in the Swat Valley are going through in my March photo essay: “Pakistan’s New Homeless.”

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Preeti Aroon was copy chief at Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2016 and was an FP assistant editor from 2007 to 2009. Twitter: @pjaroonFP

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