Putin’s first magazine column: Firing people is hard

In contrat to vlogging, live-journaling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Prime Minister Vladimiur Putin has generally preferred to let his actions do the talking. But this Friday, Putin will make his debut as a magazine columnist in the monthly magazine Russian Pioneer. But don’t expect an ideological pean to the glories of sovereign democracy. Putin’s topic ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
585519_090527_putin2.jpg
585519_090527_putin2.jpg
TOKYO - MAY 12: Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin delivers a speech during the Japan- Russia Business Forum at a hotel on May 12, 2009 in Tokyo, Japan. Putin is on a three day tour to Japan to discuss key issues between Japan and Russia, such as the return of the northern territories and financial cooperation. (Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images)

In contrat to vlogging, live-journaling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Prime Minister Vladimiur Putin has generally preferred to let his actions do the talking. But this Friday, Putin will make his debut as a magazine columnist in the monthly magazine Russian Pioneer. But don't expect an ideological pean to the glories of sovereign democracy.

Putin's topic is management, specifically "why it's hard to fire people." But the released exceprts of the column, as printed by The Independent,  do seem to offer a few clues to recent Kremlin infighting though:

Conflicts within a team, especially within a big team, always arise," writes Mr Putin, in extracts leaked to a Russian news agency. "This happens every minute, every second – simply because between people there are always clashes of interest."...

In contrat to vlogging, live-journaling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Prime Minister Vladimiur Putin has generally preferred to let his actions do the talking. But this Friday, Putin will make his debut as a magazine columnist in the monthly magazine Russian Pioneer. But don’t expect an ideological pean to the glories of sovereign democracy.

Putin’s topic is management, specifically “why it’s hard to fire people.” But the released exceprts of the column, as printed by The Independent,  do seem to offer a few clues to recent Kremlin infighting though:

Conflicts within a team, especially within a big team, always arise,” writes Mr Putin, in extracts leaked to a Russian news agency. “This happens every minute, every second – simply because between people there are always clashes of interest.”…

“I can say honestly that while I was president, if I hadn’t interfered in certain situations, in Russia there would long ago ceased to have been a government.” …

“In contrast to previous, Soviet rulers, I always do it personally. I usually call the person into my office, look them in the eye, and say: ‘There are concrete complaints. If you think this isn’t true, then please, you can fight against it; argue your case’.”

Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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