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Can a “blonde parade” pull Latvia out of recession?

In some countries, notably Iceland, the financial crisis and its political fallout has proved an unexpected boon for women’s rights. Other countries do this sort of thing: The global economic crisis has hit the Baltic state of Latvia particularly hard and left the population feeling blue. But one group of Latvian women has taken a ...

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Six blonds pose during Blonde Weekend before the parade through the streets of the capital Riga on May 31, 2009. An army of 500 blondes will try to put a smile back on the face of recession-weary Latvians by staging a festival this weekend designed to show that they really do have more fun. AFP PHOTO/ILMARS ZNOTINS (Photo credit should read ILMARS ZNOTINS/AFP/Getty Images)

In some countries, notably Iceland, the financial crisis and its political fallout has proved an unexpected boon for women's rights.

Other countries do this sort of thing:

The global economic crisis has hit the Baltic state of Latvia particularly hard and left the population feeling blue. But one group of Latvian women has taken a novel approach to fighting the pervasive feeling of doom and gloom.

In some countries, notably Iceland, the financial crisis and its political fallout has proved an unexpected boon for women’s rights.

Other countries do this sort of thing:

The global economic crisis has hit the Baltic state of Latvia particularly hard and left the population feeling blue. But one group of Latvian women has taken a novel approach to fighting the pervasive feeling of doom and gloom.

On Sunday, a procession of more than 500 blondes paraded through the capital Riga wearing pink and white. Many were escorted by lap dogs wearing the same cheerful hues. Their goal: to use their beauty to shine a little light into the dark mood caused by the global downturn.

The march was organized by the Latvian Blondes Association. I have to wonder what sort of issues this group addresses during normal times.

ILMARS ZNOTINS/AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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