Syrians are unlikely to ride the Google Wave any time soon

If you haven’t yet noticed, today is my "bash-a-tech-company-for-unnecessary-censorship" day. It’s Google’s turn. Unless you live in an Internet-free cave, you must have heard about Google Wave by now. You may have watched the long introductory video; if you found it exciting, you may have even signed up to be notified  about Google’s Wave release ...

If you haven't yet noticed, today is my "bash-a-tech-company-for-unnecessary-censorship" day.

If you haven’t yet noticed, today is my "bash-a-tech-company-for-unnecessary-censorship" day.

It’s Google’s turn. Unless you live in an Internet-free cave, you must have heard about Google Wave by now. You may have watched the long introductory video; if you found it exciting, you may have even signed up to be notified  about Google’s Wave release date. After all, how else would you know that Google Wave has been released (that’s an ironic question :-)? 

That is, you could have done all of the above unless you are in, say, Syria. There, you apparently can’t even sign up to be notified about Google Wave’s release because "you are accessing this page from a forbidden country" (anyway, what’s a "forbidden country" – don’t they have lawyers in Mountain View?).

Now, come on, Google: Syrians along with some other "forbidden nations" already suffer enough from their bad governments; they also suffer from the lack of tools to protest against these governments. So now they also have to face an information blockade? Can’t you just let them pretend to experience the same Web as the rest of us for at least a day? 

Evgeny Morozov is a fellow at the Open Society Institute and sits on the board of OSI's Information Program. He writes the Net Effect blog on ForeignPolicy.com
Tag: Syria

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