Brazilian senators want to reserve the right to piracy for themselves only

I don’t envy Eduardo Azeredo, a senator from Brazil, who is pushing for the criminalization of file-sharing in a new cybercrimes act.  For him, it must have been devastating to discover that one of the Senate’s own servers is full of illegal digital goodies, with his comrades swapping recent Hollywood flicks and music: …what they ...

I don't envy Eduardo Azeredo, a senator from Brazil, who is pushing for the criminalization of file-sharing in a new cybercrimes act.  For him, it must have been devastating to discover that one of the Senate's own servers is full of illegal digital goodies, with his comrades swapping recent Hollywood flicks and music:

I don’t envy Eduardo Azeredo, a senator from Brazil, who is pushing for the criminalization of file-sharing in a new cybercrimes act.  For him, it must have been devastating to discover that one of the Senate’s own servers is full of illegal digital goodies, with his comrades swapping recent Hollywood flicks and music:

…what they discovered on the government servers was a small mountain of copyrighted movies, music and games in several folders. These folders are available to the Senate’s staff and the senators themselves, including Eduardo Azeredo, the senator pushing for tough legislation against pirates.

Accessing the material proved easy enough. Anyone on the network could make a few clicks to get access to the folders. One of them around 6.4Gb in size contained music from Nelly Furtado through to albums by Megadeth, along with Brazilian acts and more well known groups such as Pink Floyd. Other folders included many top-rated PC games. Movies didn’t escape either, with Hollywood movies such as Iron Man, a DVD screener copy of Gran Torino and Happy Feet, all available for download by those running the country.

Evgeny Morozov is a fellow at the Open Society Institute and sits on the board of OSI's Information Program. He writes the Net Effect blog on ForeignPolicy.com

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