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Is Iran the end of the MSM?

The Atlantic‘s Conor Friedersdorf has an interesting thought piece on how media coverage of the events in Iran may be a harbinger of a digital future to come: Are we approaching a point where political information is processed so fast that an event happens, information elites weigh in to shape the discourse surrounding it, the ...

The Atlantic‘s Conor Friedersdorf has an interesting thought piece on how media coverage of the events in Iran may be a harbinger of a digital future to come:

Are we approaching a point where political information is processed so fast that an event happens, information elites weigh in to shape the discourse surrounding it, the conventional wisdom is communicated to Congress, and elected leaders formulate reactions based on public opinion… all before most of even the formerly plugged in members of the public ever learn what on earth is going on, or have a chance to form an opinion? Is anyone who works at a company that blocks their Facebook feed going to be meaningfully disadvantaged in the political process? Egalitarian concerns aside, are the information elites going to set a course, ossify as they always do in their opinions, and influence the nation’s course too hastily? Are we on course for a kind of political singularity?

In short, no.

Let’s remember that those of us who are obsessively following Iranian Twitter feeds and refreshing NIAC, Andrew Sullivan, Nico Pitney, and The Lede are kind of freaks. And the truth is, we don’t really need to know all of the details we’re sorting through when we do — we’re just fascinated by what is going on in Iran and want to stay on top of the news. For most folks, the Nazila Fathi/Michael Slackman stories offer plenty of rich information and context, while filtering out details.

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