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Protocol nominee’s tax gaffe corrected

The nominee to be State Department chief of protocol, Capricia Penavic Marshall, has cited a mix up for failure to file tax returns in 2005-2006 that has now been corrected. The New York Times reports that Marshall and her husband, a cardiologist, ended up with a $37,259 refund after the mix up was discovered and ...

The nominee to be State Department chief of protocol, Capricia Penavic Marshall, has cited a mix up for failure to file tax returns in 2005-2006 that has now been corrected. The New York Times reports that Marshall and her husband, a cardiologist, ended up with a $37,259 refund after the mix up was discovered and the returns were filed, and no late penalties were charged.

"In her written answers and in accounts she gave to government officials, Ms. Marshall has said the errors were unintentional," the paper reports. "She has said that her husband failed to recognize that the couple's accountant had included the tax returns for 2005 in a binder he provided with copies of the returns, and that the actual paperwork was never mailed."

With the rank of ambassador and requiring Senate confirmation, the chief of protocol helps advise the president and vice president on protocol matters abroad and plans events for visiting foreign leaders. In line at a grocery store Sunday, Marshall was advised by a woman in line ahead of her to wear pink to her confirmation hearings. Those southern senators, the woman in line advised her, they just can't beat up on a lady in pink.

The nominee to be State Department chief of protocol, Capricia Penavic Marshall, has cited a mix up for failure to file tax returns in 2005-2006 that has now been corrected. The New York Times reports that Marshall and her husband, a cardiologist, ended up with a $37,259 refund after the mix up was discovered and the returns were filed, and no late penalties were charged.

"In her written answers and in accounts she gave to government officials, Ms. Marshall has said the errors were unintentional," the paper reports. "She has said that her husband failed to recognize that the couple’s accountant had included the tax returns for 2005 in a binder he provided with copies of the returns, and that the actual paperwork was never mailed."

With the rank of ambassador and requiring Senate confirmation, the chief of protocol helps advise the president and vice president on protocol matters abroad and plans events for visiting foreign leaders. In line at a grocery store Sunday, Marshall was advised by a woman in line ahead of her to wear pink to her confirmation hearings. Those southern senators, the woman in line advised her, they just can’t beat up on a lady in pink.

Laura Rozen writes The Cable daily at ForeignPolicy.com.

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