Some light reading while I’m away

While I’m on vacation at an undisclosed location, feel free to peruse my latest non-blog publication, Alphabet Soup: The Political Economy of the Great Recession (.pdf), commissioned by the Glasshouse Forum.  As they put it:  The current global economic crisis, which began as a subprime crisis and developed into a general credit crisis, is the deepest ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast.

While I'm on vacation at an undisclosed location, feel free to peruse my latest non-blog publication, Alphabet Soup: The Political Economy of the Great Recession (.pdf), commissioned by the Glasshouse Forum.  As they put it

While I’m on vacation at an undisclosed location, feel free to peruse my latest non-blog publication, Alphabet Soup: The Political Economy of the Great Recession (.pdf), commissioned by the Glasshouse Forum.  As they put it

The current global economic crisis, which began as a subprime crisis and developed into a general credit crisis, is the deepest since the Depression of the 1930’s. There are many signs that we are now facing the beginning of a structural sea change. But what will it be like?

To get a better understanding of the medium-term effects of the crisis, Glasshouse Forum asked Daniel W. Drezner, Professor of International Politics at The Fletcher School, Tufts University, and author of the Glasshouse Forum report White Whale or Red Herring? Assessing Sovereign Wealth Funds, to draft scenarios and make qualified estimates based on as much objective data and historical parallels as possible.

I’d like to stress the word "qualified." 

Read it and weep

 

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast. Twitter: @dandrezner

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