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The Amazing Merkel and the Islamic Avengers?

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a transnational, multi-denominational, interfaith co-op of superheroes? International diplomacy may well have found a new medium: the comic book — forging inspired coalitions, and trumpeting unlikely champions.  In anticipation of upcoming elections, a 64-page comic novel featuring heroine Angela Merkel has hit Germany’s streets. As some critics are ...

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It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a transnational, multi-denominational, interfaith co-op of superheroes? International diplomacy may well have found a new medium: the comic book — forging inspired coalitions, and trumpeting unlikely champions. 

In anticipation of upcoming elections, a 64-page comic novel featuring heroine Angela Merkel has hit Germany’s streets. As some critics are noting that it took three and a half years for the German chancellor to be satirized in this way is something of a compliment, especially when pitted against  similar works based on Nicolas Sarkozy and Gordon Brown. Indeed laughs wasn’t the only aim with the Merkel bio-comic: “We wanted to both amuse and educate readers about the main points in her life,” its creator told reporters.

And while Merkel may be giving Wonder Woman a run for her money, Batina the Hidden, the burka-wearing heroine of The 99, a Muslim comic book series, is suiting up to join forces

The United States’ DC Comics and Kuwait’s Teshkeel Comics will collaborate on an “unprecedented” miniseries collaboration expected to hit shops within the year.

Characters of The 99 anthology battle evil the “Islamic way,” representing the 99 attributes of Allah. The 99 comic books “sell about 1m copies a year, enjoy a high profile in the Middle East. The adventures are to be made into an animated film, while the first of several 99-inspired theme parks has opened in Kuwait.”

There’s some question about how Wonder Woman’s immodest getup will cross the cultural lines abroad while others are accusing the American creators of “Muslim pandering,” but creators are optimistic that in a post-Bush world, the American superheroes will be welcome among Middle East readership. 

And so it would seem Obama will be adding international comic book alliances to his list of recent triumphs.  

ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, it’s a transnational, multi-denominational, interfaith co-op of superheroes? International diplomacy may well have found a new medium: the comic book — forging inspired coalitions, and trumpeting unlikely champions. 

In anticipation of upcoming elections, a 64-page comic novel featuring heroine Angela Merkel has hit Germany’s streets. As some critics are noting that it took three and a half years for the German chancellor to be satirized in this way is something of a compliment, especially when pitted against  similar works based on Nicolas Sarkozy and Gordon Brown. Indeed laughs wasn’t the only aim with the Merkel bio-comic: “We wanted to both amuse and educate readers about the main points in her life,” its creator told reporters.

And while Merkel may be giving Wonder Woman a run for her money, Batina the Hidden, the burka-wearing heroine of The 99, a Muslim comic book series, is suiting up to join forces

The United States’ DC Comics and Kuwait’s Teshkeel Comics will collaborate on an “unprecedented” miniseries collaboration expected to hit shops within the year.

Characters of The 99 anthology battle evil the “Islamic way,” representing the 99 attributes of Allah. The 99 comic books “sell about 1m copies a year, enjoy a high profile in the Middle East. The adventures are to be made into an animated film, while the first of several 99-inspired theme parks has opened in Kuwait.”

There’s some question about how Wonder Woman’s immodest getup will cross the cultural lines abroad while others are accusing the American creators of “Muslim pandering,” but creators are optimistic that in a post-Bush world, the American superheroes will be welcome among Middle East readership. 

And so it would seem Obama will be adding international comic book alliances to his list of recent triumphs.  

ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images

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