Iraqi government clamps down on visits to Saddam’s grave

Former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein’s grave, located near Tikrit in the town of Awja, often receives visitors. But, after local students made the pilgrimage as part of a school trip, the regime in Baghdad got tough:   In a statement, the government said it had sent instructions to the education ministry and local authorities banning ...

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583935_090707_husseingrave2.jpg
AWJA, IRAQ - JANUARY 11: Iraqi men pray at the grave of Iraq?s former President Saddam Hussein on January 11, 2007 in his home town Awja in Tikirt province 80 miles north of Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq's President Jalal Talabani has called for a delay in executing Barzan al-Tikriti and Awad al-Bandar due to be executed this week for crimes against humanity. (Photo by Getty Images).

Former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein's grave, located near Tikrit in the town of Awja, often receives visitors. But, after local students made the pilgrimage as part of a school trip, the regime in Baghdad got tough:

 

Former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein’s grave, located near Tikrit in the town of Awja, often receives visitors. But, after local students made the pilgrimage as part of a school trip, the regime in Baghdad got tough:

 

In a statement, the government said it had sent instructions to the education ministry and local authorities banning them from organising visits to the tomb of the former president.

The rule applies only to the education district of Salahuddin and not to any other part of Iraq, because, as one official put it, “no one from anywhere else in the country was likely to contemplate organizing a school tour to the grave.”

Getty Images

Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.
Tag: Iraq

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