China no longer treating Web addiction with electroshock therapy

Yeah, “electro-convulsive therapy” doesn’t quite sit well with me, either: China’s ministry of health has banned the use of electric shock treatment to cure internet addiction. […] An earlier report by the Information Times claimed patients received electroconvulsive therapy if they broke any of the centre’s rules, which included eating chocolate, locking the bathroom door, ...

583604_090714_webaddict5.jpg
583604_090714_webaddict5.jpg

Yeah, "electro-convulsive therapy" doesn't quite sit well with me, either:

Yeah, “electro-convulsive therapy” doesn’t quite sit well with me, either:

China’s ministry of health has banned the use of electric shock treatment to cure internet addiction. […]

An earlier report by the Information Times claimed patients received electroconvulsive therapy if they broke any of the centre’s rules, which included eating chocolate, locking the bathroom door, taking pills before a meal and sitting on Yang’s chair without permission. It said parents had to sign a contract acknowledging their child would be given ECT before admission.

Seems like this Yang fellow was on something of a power trip (no pun intended). Does this make for two cases in which Beijing’s intervention was a good thing?

I suppose not abusing one’s patients is a step forward, of sorts.

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Brian Fung is an editorial researcher at FP.

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