Passport

South Korea’s military is weird

I’m not sure exactly what kind of attack these South Korean special-ops soldiers are preparing for. I guess you never know with the North Koreans: The South Koreans do seem to have a penchant for over-the-top, incomprehensible military drills. Remember this Passport classic?   Both photos: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

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TAEAN-GUN, SOUTH KOREA - AUGUST 05: South Korean special warfare command's soldiers take part in a sea infiltration drill against possible threats from North Korea at Taean seashore on August 5, 2009 in Taean, South Korea. The Korean peninsula is the world's last Cold War frontier as stalinist North Korea and pro-western South Korea have been technically at war since the 1950-53 conflict. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

I’m not sure exactly what kind of attack these South Korean special-ops soldiers are preparing for. I guess you never know with the North Koreans:

The South Koreans do seem to have a penchant for over-the-top, incomprehensible military drills. Remember this Passport classic?

 

Both photos: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

I’m not sure exactly what kind of attack these South Korean special-ops soldiers are preparing for. I guess you never know with the North Koreans:

The South Koreans do seem to have a penchant for over-the-top, incomprehensible military drills. Remember this Passport classic?

 

Both photos: Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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