Ramzan Kadyrov creates his own reality

Whatever you say about Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, the guy is comfortable making big promises: Every year the economy suffers losses but also sees gains and no one knows what’s going to happen tomorrow. The only thing I can say is that we’ll fully rebuild Chechnya and solve every social problem. Chechnya will be the ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
582439_090810_kadyrov2.jpg
582439_090810_kadyrov2.jpg
President of Chechnya Ramzan Kadyrov speaks to the press outside Grozny in Tsentoroy on April 16, 2009 about the end of the anti-terror operation. Russia's move to end its hotly controversial anti-terror operation in Chechnya is a victory for maverick leader Ramzan Kadyrov, who will now have a freer hand to control his war-ravaged region. AFP PHOTO / VISKHAN MAGOMADOV (Photo credit should read VISKHAN MAGOMADOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Whatever you say about Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, the guy is comfortable making big promises:

Every year the economy suffers losses but also sees gains and no one knows what's going to happen tomorrow. The only thing I can say is that we'll fully rebuild Chechnya and solve every social problem. Chechnya will be the most successful region in Russia and the world.

Has no interest in feigning sympathy for his recently deceased enemies:

Whatever you say about Chechen President Ramzan Kadyrov, the guy is comfortable making big promises:

Every year the economy suffers losses but also sees gains and no one knows what’s going to happen tomorrow. The only thing I can say is that we’ll fully rebuild Chechnya and solve every social problem. Chechnya will be the most successful region in Russia and the world.

Has no interest in feigning sympathy for his recently deceased enemies:

[Recently murdered human rights activist Natalia Estemirova] never had any honor or sense of shame. And still I appointed her head of a [civil society advisory] commission with the mayor of Grozny as her deputy. I wanted to be objective about addressing the issue. But she didn’t like it. She would say stupid things. I told her, “You’re a woman, and we’re trying to do something for the people. But if it doesn’t work, don’t blame us.”

And little shame in sucking up to the boss:

By lowering his status [by stepping down as president], Putin again showed his strength and that he’s a servant of the people. But that doesn’t change my attitude toward him. I’d still give my life for him.

RFE/RL: Would you like to see Putin become president again?

Kadyrov: Very much. I want Putin to be president of Russia for life. 

Check out the whole unbelievable interview with Radio Free Europe, especially Kadyrov’s explanation of how human rights groups and violating his human rights by saying such nasty things about him. 

AFP/Getty Images

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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