German candidate campaigns on cleavage

If you got it, flaunt it. At least that’s what my grandmother used to say, and I imagine if she could see the campaign ads coming out of Germany this week, she’d probably laugh. And Vera Lengsfeld, who is running for a parliament seat in Germany’s upcoming September elections, is banking on the fact that ...

582361_090811_merkelb2.jpg
582361_090811_merkelb2.jpg

If you got it, flaunt it. At least that's what my grandmother used to say, and I imagine if she could see the campaign ads coming out of Germany this week, she'd probably laugh. And Vera Lengsfeld, who is running for a parliament seat in Germany's upcoming September elections, is banking on the fact that constituents will have a sense of humor.

The ad (shown above) pairs pictures of Lengsfeld and none other than Chancellor Angela Merkel, shoulder to shoulder showcasing the bountiful assets bestowed upon them by Mother Nature -- two very ample bosoms barely contained by two seriously wide and plunging necklines. The line that runs across reads: "We have more to offer."

If you got it, flaunt it. At least that’s what my grandmother used to say, and I imagine if she could see the campaign ads coming out of Germany this week, she’d probably laugh. And Vera Lengsfeld, who is running for a parliament seat in Germany’s upcoming September elections, is banking on the fact that constituents will have a sense of humor.

The ad (shown above) pairs pictures of Lengsfeld and none other than Chancellor Angela Merkel, shoulder to shoulder showcasing the bountiful assets bestowed upon them by Mother Nature — two very ample bosoms barely contained by two seriously wide and plunging necklines. The line that runs across reads: “We have more to offer.”

No doubt, where there’s more chest, there’s more attention. Lengsfeld, who did not clear the ads with Merkel, reports that traffic to her blog has increased, getting as many as 17,000 visitors since this campaign went public.

Her takeaway on all this? 

If only a tenth of them also look at the content of my policies, then I will have reached many more people than I could have done with classic street canvassing.”

It’s an interesting acknowledgement on Lengsfeld’s part, she’s clearly aware that the show-stopping photos aren’t appealing to the thinking minds of men and women, though it sounds as though she’s hoping the ad’s wit will trump the old T&A approach.

Many of those not laughing are likely to be women who find the posters, and the ploy behind them, cheap and offensive. The glass ceiling runs far and wide, thicker over some places than others, and apparently the profiles of men cast long shadows, even over the most powerful women in global politics. Truthfully, I’d like to see a man foolish enough to market his campaign “package” in the same fashion … Or has Berlusconi kind of done that already?

MICHAEL GOTTSCHALK/AFP/Getty Images

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